The United States of Crostini

Find your state, then make a toast!

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The United States of Crostini

Find your state, then make a toast!

How To Make Crostini

Thinly slice 1 baguette; brush or drizzle the slices with olive oil on both sides. Bake on a baking sheet at 350 degrees F until crisp and lightly golden around the edges, 15 minutes.

Alabama

Goat Cheese + Blackberries + Pecans

Fun Fact: When students at Fairhope Elementary in southern Alabama realized there was no state fruit, they took action—and in 2004 the blackberry took the honor.

Alaska

Cream Cheese + Smoked Salmon + Dill

Fun Fact: Alaska is the only state with coasts on three seas (the Arctic, Bering and Pacific), and half of the country’s commercially harvested fish comes from here.

Arizona

Pepper Jack + Nopales (Marinated Cactus)

Fun Fact: About 42 percent of Arizona is covered in desert, and you’ll encounter cactus pretty much everywhere—especially on restaurant menus.

Arkansas

Edamame Hummus + Shelled Edamame + Lemon Zest

Fun Fact: You might not think of Arkansas as soybean central, but here the crop surpasses corn, wheat and rice combined. Mulberry, AR, even has a festival dedicated to the bean.

California

Camembert + Red Wine–Glazed Grapes

Fun Fact: The average American drinks about 15 bottles of wine a year, and a lot of it comes from California, the top wine-producing state in the country.

Colorado

Boursin + Seared Lamb

Fun Fact: If you’ve eaten lamb lately, there’s a good chance it came from Colorado. The Rocky Mountain state is one of the largest lamb-ranching areas in the country.

Connecticut

Clams Sauteed with Garlic + Oregano + Pecorino

Fun Fact: Connecticut natives are fiercely loyal to coal-fired New Haven–style pizza, particularly pizzeria Frank Pepe’s famous white pie covered in clams.

Delaware

Mayonnaise + Turkey + Cranberry Sauce + Stuffing

Fun Fact: Capriotti’s restaurant, a Wilmington mainstay, is famous for “the Bobbie”— a sandwich that amounts to the ultimate assembly of Thanksgiving leftovers.

Florida

Mustard + Ham + Roast Pork + Swiss + Cornichons

Fun Fact: Florida is a melting pot of cultures, and nearby Cuba’s beloved Cubano sandwich, made of these ingredients, is ubiquitous in Miami.

Georgia

Mascarpone + Peaches + Basil

Fun Fact: There are few things better than a juicy peach. It has been Georgia’s state fruit since 1995, and we couldn’t help but honor the traditional pairing: peaches and cream.

Hawaii

Tuna + Soy Sauce + Sesame Seeds + Scallions

Fun Fact: Poke is Hawaiian for “cut into chunks,” which is how the sashimi-grade raw fish is prepared. Locals and tourists can’t get enough of the dish.

Idaho

Mashed Potatoes + Sour Cream + Bacon + Chives

Fun Fact: Idaho’s number-one crop is potatoes, and Americans prefer them mashed or baked over all other forms. Fries, surprisingly, are third on the list!

Illinois

Cocktail Frank + Pickles + Tomatoes + Mustard + Celery Salt + Poppy Seeds

Fun Fact: You can’t visit Chicago without trying a hot dog that’s been “dragged through the garden.” The proper toppings are debatable, but one thing is certain: no ketchup!

Indiana

Dulce de Leche + Caramel Corn

Fun Fact: One of Indiana’s most famous residents was Orville Redenbacher, who started growing corn for popping at 12. The state is also home to a town called Popcorn, population 42.

Iowa

Corn Relish + Parsley

Fun Fact: Iowa produces 2.5 billion bushels of corn annually, but only 1 percent of that is the sweet corn sold in grocery stores. The rest is processed or used as livestock feed.

Kansas

Sunflower Butter + Roasted Carrots + Sunflower Seeds

Fun Fact: An 1895 state law called sunflowers “weeds” that should be destroyed, but nevertheless they went on to become the state flower in 1903.

Kentucky

Triple Crème Cheese + Bourbon Sautéed Onions

Fun Fact: Ninety-five percent of the world’s bourbon is made in Kentucky, and it’s said that there are more barrels of the spirit in the state than there are people!

Louisiana

Cajun-Spiced Cream Cheese + Cajun Shrimp

Fun Fact: Cajun cuisine is known to include the “holy trinity” of ingredients: onion, bell pepper and celery…with Cajun seasoning a close fourth. Cajun cooks love their spices!

Maine

Ricotta + Blueberries + Pepper

Fun Fact: Blueberries grow like crazy in Maine, and blueberry pie is the official state dessert. The berries are common in both sweet and savory dishes, thus the pepper here.

Maryland

Lump Crab + Lemon Juice + Old Bay + Chives

Fun Fact: Chesapeake Bay crabs are a longtime favorite in these parts, and Old Bay is the quintessential seasoning. Locals put it on everything, including ice cream.

Massachusetts

Cranberry Sauce + Brie

Fun Fact: Massachusetts started growing cranberries in the early 1800s and now about a third of the world’s cranberry acreage is located here. Wicked impressive!

Michigan

Ham + Cherry Jam + Parsley

Fun Fact: More than 4 million cherry trees blossom in the Great Lakes State every year, making it the top US producer of tart cherries and fourth in the country for sweet cherries.

Minnesota

Steamed Purple Cauliflower + Olive Oil + Sea Salt

Fun Fact: If Minnesota had a color, it would be purple. In 2016, a senator even attempted to make it the state hue in honor of Minneapolis native Prince and his hit “Purple Rain.”

Mississippi

Comeback Sauce + Shredded Lettuce + Fried Shrimp

Fun Fact: Mississippi’s greatest food contribution might be comeback sauce: The love child of rémoulade and Thousand Island is said to be so good, you’ll “come back” for more.

Missouri

Barbecue Sauce + Smoked Brisket

Fun Fact: Kansas City is known for barbecued brisket, and especially for burnt ends trimmed from the pointed end of the cut. These favorite bits were once considered discards!

Montana

Horseradish Cream + Dill + Smoked Trout

Fun Fact: Montana is home to some of the world’s best fly fishing—and some of the weirdest fishing laws: It’s illegal for a married woman to fish alone on Sundays!

Nebraska

Blue Cheese + Seared Steak

Fun Fact: It’s no question why Nebraska is known as America’s Beef State: The cattle here occupy 24 million acres, which is more than half the total land!

Nevada

Peanut Butter + Bananas + Bacon

Fun Fact: Call this one the Elvis impersonator: Odds are you can’t help falling in love with this combination of the King’s favorite sandwich ingredients.

New Hampshire

Apple Butter + Apple Pie Filling

Fun Fact: There’s nothing like autumn in New Hampshire when apple season is in full swing and there are dozens of pick-your-own farms and plenty of apple butter for all.

New Jersey

Shredded Potatoes + Mozzarella + Gravy

Fun Fact: Credit to Jersey diners for popularizing disco fries, the best snack for anyone who needs to sober up after a late night of dancing: fries, cheese, gravy—and lots of it!

New Mexico

Guacamole + Hatch Chile Salsa

Fun Fact: Chile lovers know that New Mexico is the only state that grows the famed Hatch chile. The Hatch Chile Festival in Hatch, NM, draws more than 30,000 visitors each year

New York

Scallion Cream Cheese + Tomatoes + Everything Seasoning

Fun Fact: NYC is arguably the bagel capital of the world, and it’s most likely home to the original everything bagel, too—although no one can confirm exactly who invented it.

North Carolina

Pulled Pork + Pickles

Fun Fact: The UNC-Duke rivalry has nothing on North Carolina’s BBQ war. Eastern NC sauce is peppery and vinegary; western is similar but made with ketchup. Take your pick!

North Dakota

Ground Beef + Cream of Mushroom Soup + Peas + Carrots + Tater Tots

Fun Fact: Midwesterners’ go-to comfort food is the hotdish: meat and veggies baked with canned cream-of-something soup and topped off with a starch—like Tater Tots!

Ohio

Peanut Butter + Chocolate Fudge Sauce + Sea Salt

Fun Fact: Ohio’s state tree is the buckeye (the tree’s nut resembles the eye of a deer), and the region is famous for buckeye candy: a peanut butter bonbon coated in chocolate.

Oklahoma

Scrambled Eggs + Sausage + Cheddar

Fun Fact: Oklahoma celebrates its cowboys with the National Cowboy Museum in Oklahoma City—and lots of hearty cowboy breakfasts.

Oregon

Chocolate-Hazelnut Spread + Hazelnuts

Fun Fact: Filbert sounds like the name of a distant uncle, but it’s just another word for hazelnut. The Oregon Filbert Commission became the Hazelnut Commission in 1981.

Pennsylvania

Cheez Whiz + Roast Beef + Caramelized Onions

Fun Fact: No place on earth takes steak-and-cheese sandwiches more seriously than Philadelphia does. The question is: Do you want Whiz (Cheez Whiz) or provy (provolone)?

Rhode Island

Mascarpone Mixed with Coffee Syrup + Chocolate-Covered Espresso Beans

Fun Fact: Rhode Islanders love coffee-flavored milk so much that they tend to keep it within state lines. Trader Joe’s sells coffee syrup, but like that beloved coffee milk, it’s elusive!

South Carolina

Pimiento Cheese + Pickled Jalapeños

Fun Fact: Pimiento cheese was invented in New York, but South Carolina has perfected the spread. You’ll find it everywhere, from country stores to fine-dining restaurants.

South Dakota

Ketchup + Bison Slider + Cheddar

Fun Fact: Bison are found in nearly every state in the country, but South Dakota has the most— more than 30,000!

Tennessee

Pickles + Fried Chicken + Spicy Honey

Fun Fact: Nashville hot chicken was meant to be a punishment: When a philandering husband came home late, his wife doused his fried chicken in pepper sauce. Turns out he loved it!

Texas

Cowboy Caviar + Parsley

Fun Fact: Whether you call it cowboy caviar or Texas caviar, the mix of corn, beans and peppers in a tangy vinaigrette is right at home in the Lone Star State.

Utah

Feta + Honey + Sea Salt

Fun Fact: Religious leader Brigham Young originally referred to the Utah territory as Deseret, a Mormon term for “honeybee”; he wanted people to be self-sufficient like bees.

Vermont

White Cheddar + Green Apples + Maple Syrup

Fun Fact: The Green Mountain State is as well known for cheese as it is for maple syrup because of the large population of dairy cows— there are more than 128,000!

Virginia

Butter + Virginia Ham + Pepper

Fun Fact: Virginia’s country hams are prized for their sweetness, the result of the hogs’ diet of peanuts and peaches—or, back in the day, acorns!

Washington

Apple Slaw + Chives

Fun Fact: Six out of 10 apples in the US come from Washington—the state grows 2.5 million tons every year—and all of them are picked by hand.

West Virginia

Marinara Sauce + Pepperoni + Mozzarella

Fun Fact: West Virginia’s love of pepperoni rolls is unrivaled. The meal, invented by a coal miner for easy portability, is the unofficial state food—and a gas-station staple.

Wisconsin

Colby Jack + Crushed Cheese Crackers

Fun Fact: Wisconsin cranks out 3 billion pounds of cheese every year, making it the top producer in the country. It’s the only state that requires cheese makers to get a license.

Wyoming

Garlic Mayonnaise + Beef Jerky

Fun Fact: Rumor has it the cattle industry began when a Wyoming settler, short on feed, left his cows out to graze for the winter. Shockingly, they survived by eating grass.

Washington, DC

Cheddar + Chili + White Onions

Fun Fact: Ben’s Chili Bowl has been serving DC locals, tourists and politicians since 1958. President Obama popped in for a chili dog just days before his inauguration. Ben’s Chili Bowl has been serving DC locals, tourists and politicians since 1958. President Obama popped in for a chili dog just days before his inauguration.

Puerto Rico

Avocado-Mango Salsa + Plantain Chips

Fun Fact: Puerto Rico has been part of the US since 1898, and it’s a great culinary contributor. Green plantains, a popular side dish, are often fried and served as chips.