green tea


Green tea, favored among Asians, is produced from leaves that are steamed and dried but not fermented. Such leaves produce a greenish-yellow tea and a flavor that's slightly bitter and closer to the taste of the fresh leaf. Two of the more well-known green teas are tencha and gunpowder. Scientific studies have shown that both black and green teas increase the body's antioxidant activity by up to about 45 percent. They are also said to have antibacterial powers against cavities and gum disease.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

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