Rhône wines

Pronunciation: [<em>R</em>OHN]

Wines from France's Rhône region, which follows the Rhône River for approximately 125 miles in southeastern France. The northern part of the region contains many great individual appellations including Côte Rôtie, Condrieu, Château Grillet, Saint-Joseph and Hermitage. The dominant grapes here are for red wines and Marsanne, Roussanne and Viognier for whites. The most famous appellation in the south is châteauneuf-du-pape. Most of the southern Rhône vineyards produce wines with the côtes du rhône appellation. In the southern Rhône the principal red grape is Grenache. The white grapes used include Bourboulenc, Clairette, Marsanne, Muscardine, Picardan, Roussanne and Piquepoul (or Picpoule).

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

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