spice parisienne

Pronunciation: [pa-ree-ZYEHN]

The market name for a complex spice and herb blend, also called epices fines. French cooks usually make their own blends, which can vary greatly depending on the individual. In general, Spice Parisienne includes white pepper, allspice, mace, nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon, bay leaves, sage, marjoram and rosemary. As with all spices, this blend should be stored in a cool, dark place for no more than six months.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

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