The 31 Best Cookbooks of 2022 for Everyone on Your Gift List

These gorgeous new titles will inspire and delight your favorite cooks.

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November 21, 2022

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Cookbooks make the perfect gifts — they offer food-lovers and cooks delicious new recipes to try in the kitchen, and they give readers and travelers glimpses into new cultures and regions. Our guide this year overflows with fantastic options for every taste and aesthetic — from a mouth-watering dive into southern comfort food to a fascinating exploration of the little-seen dishes of the Himalayan Trail. You'll find familiar faces here (hello, Bobby!) and much-anticipated follow-ups (see Ina's latest go-tos) as well as friendly new voices and amazing photography. And who better to tell you about these books than the hyper-passionate chefs and writers at Food Network? No matter who's on your list, our staffers have got you covered with these great picks.

We encourage you to purchase from small businesses, including independent bookstores in your area or those that exist online. We love to shop at Bookshop for online shopping, and Indie Bound can help you find independently-owned bookstores near you.

$22.15

Barefoot Contest fans rejoice! Ina Garten has released another delightful cookbook. Go-To Dinners: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook stays true to her classic techniques and flavors but is also inspired by simple yet delectable meals meant to bring friends and family together, no matter the occasion. Chapters run the gamut, from Drinks and Apps and Breakfast for Dinner to Family Dinners and Desserts. Each recipe is marked as freeze-ahead, make-ahead, prep-ahead or assembled for dinner-making that's a breeze to pull off. In Ina's book (literally!), “A go-to recipe should be simple to follow and work every time. It must be easy to prepare and still delicious enough to get everyone to your table so you, too, can create a happy community of family and friends around yourself.” The beloved star delivers on that promise with recipes like Creamy Chicken Thighs with Lemon and Thyme, which comes together in one skillet, and Overnight Mac and Cheese—no roux required. There are even simplified drinks and desserts, including Pink Grapefruit Palomas and Bourbon Chocolate Pecan Pie, where using store-bought crust is actually encouraged. This family-friendly cookbook will be appreciated by home cooks of all skill levels—and by any die-hard Ina fan.

Amanda Neal, Recipe Developer

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$29.99

Filled with easy-to-create family recipes and heartwarming pages dedicated to father-daughter memories—including a love for pistachio milkshakes—Sundays with Sophie is a warm invitation into the kitchen with Bobby Flay and his daughter, Sophie. Throughout the book, Bobby inspires us with elevated comfort foods and drinks for any occasion--think Bobby’s Crunch Burgers piled high with BBQ mushrooms and potato chips, and big bowls of Spaghetti with Zucchini and Shishito Pesto. We get an intimate glimpse into Bobby’s family life, thanks to pictures of him and Sophie in the kitchen and around the table, as well as through nostalgic recipes, like his Pregame Rum Punch, inspired by game days spent with Sophie during her college years. Many of the recipes are accompanied by quotes from Sophie sharing sweet memories—like the times her dad would warn the staff at his restaurants not to leave steamed mussels near (then baby) Sophie because she would eat them. Bobby also sprinkles the book with guidance on many kitchen basics, including butterflying chicken and scrambling eggs, that are guaranteed to help anyone looking to gain confidence in the kitchen.

Meg Adler, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$21.73

A lot has changed for Molly Yeh since she published her first cookbook six years ago. Her hit Food Network cooking show, Girl Meets Farm, is now in its 11th season; she’s added a few more rooms to her Minnesota farmhouse; and, most importantly, she’s become a mother of two! It’s that last milestone that Molly credits as the inspiration behind her new cookbook, Home is Where the Eggs Are: Farmhouse Food for the People You Love. Wanting to create cherished family memories and traditions, Molly calls making meals for— and eating with—her husband and girls, Bernie and Ira, her “highest priority.” While she still loves fried cheese and loathes bananas, she now tackles food in a more purposeful way, choosing meals that can be made ahead of time and that will last longer and produce more leftovers (all the better to freeze and use as shortcuts later on). Busy parents will appreciate recipes like Molly’s one-of-a-kind Sweet Potato and Black Bean Burritos (the secret is roasting the sweet potatoes first so they develop a crunchy texture) and her beef-stuffed Baked Egg Rolls, which can be kept in the freezer for up to three months. The cookbook is also chock full of dishes her family relies on, including hotdish, the super-comforting, Midwestern casserole that Molly says she’s “soooo happy” her daughters will “grow up with.” And since you can’t talk about Molly without mentioning ingredients like dark chocolate, marzipan, matcha and sprinkles, the cookbook also includes a yummy assortment of dessert recipes that home bakers of all ages will love, like Pumpkin Scone Loaf, Matcha Egg Creams and Marzipan Chocolate Chip Cookies.

Michelle Baricevic, Online Editorial Coordinator, Food Network Magazine

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$31.49

Kardea Brown’s The Way Home is an inviting look into the Gullah Geechee food traditions of the Sea Islands of South Carolina where the Food Network star grew up. Warmly addressing her audience as “cousins,” Kardea tells stories about her grandmother, her own journey from a job as a social worker to hosting her show, Delicious Miss Brown and finding the kitchen as her comfort zone. The recipes, such as Buffalo Blue Fried Shrimp, are what Kardea calls New Gullah—food that reflects her Gullah Geechee heritage and the preservation of West African food and traditions, but with some delicious, innovative changes. There is a whole chapter on preserves, including a recipe for Hot Peppa Jelly. Kardea also shares recipes like Deviled Crabs that were featured on her show. Fans of Delicious Miss Brown, those looking to learn about Gullah Geechee cuisine and home cooks excited to expand their repertoire in a meaningful way are sure to love this book.

Sam Marcus, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$14.99

If you (or any people on your gift list) have ever wanted to create your favorite Thai dishes at home, Jet Tila's new cookbook, 101 Thai Dishes You Need To Cook Before You Die: The Essential Recipes, Techniques and Ingredients of Thailand, has got you covered. The book is divided into chapters by both style of dish (i.e., noodles, rice, sweets) as well as protein type, making it easy to find what you are craving. Tila has even dedicated a whole chapter to plant-based Thai that uses smart swaps to make recipes that are just as umami- and flavor-rich as their meat- or seafood-laden counterparts. The pantry breakdown at the beginning of the book teaches readers about the quintessential ingredients in Thai cooking and their best applications. It also inspires confidence in tackling favorites like Shrimp Tom Yum Soup (Tom Yum Goong) from the Curries and Soups: Bowls of Yum section and Papaya Salad (Som Tum Thai) from the Salads & Umami Veggies section. Jet’s friendly and approachable attitude from the screen comes through on every page of this book—and you can feel his love for and pride in Thai cuisine radiate.

Melissa Gaman, Recipe Developer, Food Network

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$34.99

While there are many fabulous dessert cookbooks, this passion project is one of the very few books dedicated entirely to savory pastries—or, in Erin McDowell’s words, “the cheesy, the crispy, the melty, warm and doughy.” Inside, you’ll find twists on comfort-food classics, such as French Onion Muffins, Baby Baguettes, Runzas and Jalapeño Pastry Poppers, plus mainstays like Ultimate Garlic Bread and Chicken and Dumplings. Just looking at the golden-hued, butter-infused photographs will make you hungry.

Heath Goldman, Culinary Editor

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$17.99

Matt Horn is an award-winning pitmaster and the owner of the acclaimed Horn Barbecue in Oakland, CA. His story is an inspiring one of a man who heard his calling in life and followed it through. In his introduction, he sums up his philosophy in a lesson that goes far beyond the kitchen: “Love and patience are the two main ingredients for cooking amazing barbecue as well as living life.” His new book, Horn Barbecue: Recipes and Techniques from a Master of the Art of BBQ, is both a love letter to and a primer on the craft of barbecue. Matt breaks down every aspect of great barbecue—from equipment to the best cuts to cook by smoking—for home cooks and offers detailed step-by-step photos to help you along (in addition to lots of drool-worthy recipe photos!). His recipes include perennial favorites like Horn Brisket, but he also branches out with recipes for smoking lamb, duck and even rabbit. And, like any good pitmaster, Matt doesn’t forget the sides or dessert! Southern Fried Cabbage and Smoked Pit Beans? Yes, please! And let’s finish it off with his Georgia Peach Cobbler for good measure. This is a fantastic book for any avid outdoor cook or barbecue lover.

Amy Stevenson, Recipe Developer

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$25.73

When most people think of Italian food, they don't usually associate it with Jewish cuisine but Italian food writer Benedetta Jasmine Guetta has written a book to change that. In Cooking alla Giudia, Benedetta tells us how, through trade and migration, Jews were responsible for bringing ingredients like eggplant, cardoons and fennel to the country. With meticulous research and historical context, she talks about the "unmistakably Jewish combination of pine nuts and raisins" and how Tuscan Fried Chicken was derived from a Hannukah meal in communities around Lucca. You will find familiar dishes with an Italian twist, including Charoset (a nut and fruit paste eaten at Passover that here is made with pine nuts and hazelnuts); Italian classics adapted for kashrut (the kosher set of rules for eating), like Lasagna Kasher (lasagna made with roux-thickened stock instead of bechamel sauce or cheese); and regional specialties, such as Piemontese Tagliolini con la Bagna Brusca (fresh pasta in a sauce made from sour grape juice and egg-enriched broth) and Sardines en Saor (sweet-and-sour fried and marinated fish from Venice). Benedetta offers no shortage of desserts, both with and without dairy, like Monte Sinai e Uova Filate (a popular almond cake appropriate for Passover) or a lemon-inflected, latticed Crostata di Ricotta e Visciole (ricotta and sour cherry crostata). With the once flourishing Italo-Jewish population now dwindling, it's as important as ever to preserve these recipes and traditions that have undoubtedly helped shape the country's culinary landscape. Whether you are Jewish or someone who enjoys learning about Italian food and food history (or if you eat a dairy-free diet), Cooking alla Guida makes a delicious and important addition to a cookbook collection.

Alexis Pisciotta, Culinary Purchasing and Events Manager, Food Network Kitchen

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$16.29

When I read that Alexis deBoschnek's new cookbook had a recipe for a frittata with leek tops—yes, the part every other recipe on the internet expects you will discard, or perhaps only occasionally suggest you save for stock—I knew it was worth digging into more. Alexis offers a cooking roadmap with this book: Start with one recipe and then follow her notes to the others that will make use of leftover ingredients. The goal is to leave nothing behind—or in the trash —and Alexis offers clever solutions for more sustainable (and money-saving) kitchen habits. Her Really Good Meatballs (which do, in fact, sound really good) rely on cornmeal, which can be used to make creamy polenta later on—or to serve with the meatballs! Snap Pea, Daikon and Fennel Slaw insists you use the fennel stalks to create even greater crunch. And about that frittata? The leek tops wilt in just two to three minutes on the stove; you'll be asking yourself, "Why didn't I do this all along?

Lauren Piro, Editorial Director

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$40.99

Sourdough has been a darling of home bakers in the past few years, but it can be intimidating even to a seasoned cook. Greg Wade’s new book, Bread Head, guides us through the process with equal amounts of science and common sense. To say this book is just about sourdough though would be missing the mark. The James Beard Award-winning baker is currently head baker at Chicago’s Publican Quality Bread and is passionate about showcasing local, organic grains in breads and pastries, sourdough or not. In the first 60 or so pages, Greg walks us through his process of bread-making step by step. And while he admits to “nerding out” a bit about the process, he explains everything in such a straightforward manner that it’s all easy to understand. The chapters move from simple non-fermented loaves, like his Wheat Sandwich Loaf, and ramp up until you’ve got the skills to produce more ambitious sourdough beauties, like his Peach Cashew Loaf. Greg also takes a few twists into sweet baking with recipes like Sorghum Blondies and Oat Madeleines. This book would be a welcome addition to the shelf of any serious home baker.

Amy Stevenson, Recipe Developer

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$29.99

Emily Megget (often called Miss Emily or the Matriarch of Edisto Island) is such an artful storyteller, it feels like she is right there with you—teaching you about her family and friends’ history on Edisto Island, one of South Carolina's Sea Islands and where she has lived her entire 89 years. In Gullah Geechee Home Cooking: Recipes from the Matriarch of Edisto Island, Miss Emily tells how the Gullah and Geechee people’s food traditions and expertise were passed down from their West African ancestors and enshrined by enslaved people in the Southeastern US. She shows how the Gullah Geechee people helped shape American food and culture, and showcases their sustainable, local and seasonal cooking—often in recipes with larger than usual serving sizes, as Miss Emily has 10 children and more than 50 grandchildren and great grandchildren. You'll find Lowcountry classics like Shrimp and Grits with Gravy and recipes that Miss Emily proudly states will be new to most people, like Salt Pork with Wild Cat Sauce. She also generously shares the recipe for her signature dish, Stuffed Fish with Parsley and Roe. This book demonstrates the meaning and importance of food: every recipe helps tell the essential story of the Gullah Geechee people.

Sam Marcus, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$23.49

There are so many reasons to love Eric Kim's book: the storytelling will have you reading it cover to cover, like a novel; the vivid descriptions of the food and ingredients will have you earmarking dozens of recipes to make later. Come for the fluffy Milk Bread (which is easy and delightful; I've made it six times this year so far), the gorgeously pungent kimchi, the Smashed Potatoes with a Roasted-Seaweed Sour Cream Dip you'll want to put on every single thing you eat or the brilliant Sheet-Pan Bibimbap, and stay for the lovely relationship between a son and his mother, and his tribute to home, and all that it means. Korean American is a great gift for the person in your life who appreciates great food writing, the one who appreciates thoughtful recipes that are created with the home cook in mind, the one who appreciates cooking from home, wherever that is and whatever that means to them, or, of course, for yourself.

Michelle Buffardi, VP, Digital Content

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$23.84

My copy of Rick Martinez's Mi Cocina: Recipes and Rapture from My Kitchen in México is so splattered and dog-eared it’s no longer fit for the coffee table. The recipes in this book are clearly grounded in real experiences. For example, his luscious Gaspacho Moreliano (a juicy salad of mangos, pineapple and chiles) was inspired by the snack sellers on the streets of Morelia west of Mexico City and the technique behind Pescado a la Talla (orange-marinated red snapper) was taught to him by a fisherman's sister-in-law in Puerto Escondido. Rick’s ingredients lists are short, his pantry is simple and his recipes are written with an unusual level of detail that benefits cooks of all levels. "Why do I measure in grams? Because I love you," he writes, explaining how the weight and size of produce can vary, impacting a dish's outcome. (Though I can attest that skipping the scale also yields delicious results.) Filled with vivid photos of the food, people and landscapes the native Texan encountered on his 20,000-mile journey across Mexico to research the book, Mi Cocina offers a vivid view into a world that you will want to make your own.

Lygeia Grace, Culinary Editorial Director

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$26.49

It is no secret that I am a huge fan of Via Carota, the West Village's perennially popular Italian restaurant. In fact, I like it so much I once showed up with friends for lunch and we stayed so long and drank so many negronis that we realized dinner service had started so we stayed for that meal as well. To get two Via Carota meals in one day felt like we had won the lottery. What also feels like winning the lottery is getting a copy of Jody Williams and Rita Sodi’s new cookbook, so that I can finally enjoy their exquisite food whenever I like at home. Via Carota is a beautifully shot and perfectly curated selection of the restaurant’s beloved menu items, divided by season. I like that it is rooted in tradition, paying homage to many Italian classics--like Braciole al Latte--while also displaying the partners’ personal touches--like topping the dish with the unexpected addition of homemade fennel seed salt. Despite the fact that cooking is my day job, this book makes me want to get into the kitchen to cook it from cover to cover. I have a slew of family and friends that love everything Italian, and this will be the gift I give to each and every one of them this year.

Ginevra Iverson, Test Kitchen Director

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$29.99

It takes a lot of confidence to call a book a bible, but award-winning author and legendary baker Rose Levy Beranbaum has once again created a must-have tome for novice and experienced bakers alike. The Cookie Bible joins her collection of 12 cookbooks, including The Cake Bible, The Baking Bible and The Bread Bible. Weighing in at over 400 pages, this book is absolutely packed with information, contextual headnotes, tips (charmingly named Baking Gems) and techniques to address anything that could possibly go wrong. Measurements are provided in both metric weights as well as US measurements for extra accuracy and ease of use. Beyond the sheer volume of information, The Cookie Bible is filled with tantalizing photographs of every type of cookie from different corners of the earth, ranging from rolled My Dream Chocolate Chip Cookies to piped French Tuiles, from South American sandwiched Alfajores to Greecian sesame-topped Koulourakia. There is even an appendix that sorts out flourless or eggless cookies to help those with food restrictions easily find them. There is surely a recipe (or two or 12) for every set of taste buds and baking-experience level in this book, making it a great gift for yourself or a loved one.

Melissa Gaman, Recipe Developer, Food Network

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$28.49

Ghetto Gastro’s Black Power Kitchen is a moving cookbook and manifesto that will undoubtedly have a deep impact far beyond the food world. Jon Gray, Pierre Serrao and Lester Walker, the founders of Ghetto Gastro, a culinary collective originating in the Bronx, have created a thoughtful curation of recipes, visual art, photography, interviews and prose that encompass a multiplicity of narratives around food. This book emphasizes that food is political--inseparable from long-established histories of racism, exclusion, inaccessibility and other social inequalities that are still very present today. From the volume’s first recipe—the Triple Cs (a dish of cornbread topped with crab salad and dollops of caviar)—to the Black Power Waffle that represents resistance and rebellion, the food in this book is, as the authors write, “intentional and subversive.” Alongside recipes come stories of ingredients and people. For example, the breadfruit in the Roasted Breadfruit Gnocchi is an historically inexpensive ingredient that European sugar plantation owners fed enslaved Africans. Black Power Kitchen is a much-needed reflection on the influential connections between food and identity and a gift to the food world.

Meg Adler, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$31.99

In her debut cookbook, Maren Ellingboe King takes us to the heart of the Minnesota farm she grew up on and offers recipes inspired by her grandmother and great grandmother, with pictures of both women scattered throughout the pages. Maren combines the nostalgia of Midwest recipes (think decadent cheesy potatoes) with her Scandinavian roots in offering surprise twists on classic comfort foods—here's looking at you, Apple Gjetost Grilled Cheese! Hearty Midwestern favorites are upgraded by using fresh produce and unique spices native to Scandinavia while sticking to the principles of simple cooking (i.e. one-pot dishes, short ingredient lists). If you know someone who appreciates the straightforwardness of cooking comfort dishes and has a love for local and in-season vegetables, then don't hesitate to wrap up Fresh Midwest: Modern Recipes from the Heartland for a thoughtful holiday gift.

Emily Weinberger, Recipe Developer

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$31.49

In her debut cookbook, Chinese-American chef Hannah Che shows that vegan food can be not only full of flavor, but also fulfill nostalgic cravings and connect you to your culture. The Vegan Chinese Kitchen is Hannah's way of grappling with her own experience going vegan given how much of popular vegan representation is Eurocentric. She also realized that many other vegans felt a similar disconnect with their own cultural traditions. This epiphany caused her to dive deep into vegan and vegetarian cooking traditions in China. Through stories of her family, descriptions of important ingredients, and insights from Chinese history, Hannah shines a light on Chinese vegan cooking in a book that's perfect for those looking to eat more plant-based foods or learn more about Chinese cuisine. Find veganized versions of Chinese classics, like Mapo Tofu (Mápó dòufu麻婆豆腐), and Buddhist recipes using vegetarian meat substitutes, like Vegetarian Roast Goose (Sù shāo’é 素燒鵝) from Jaingnan Province. The rest of the book is inspired by classic vegan Chinese dishes, like Three Treasures of the Earth (Dìsānxiān 地三鮮), made withs fried eggplant, potato and bell pepper.

Sam Marcus, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$30.49

Nestled in the shadows of the Himalayas is an area of disparate villages and cities central to a longstanding game of geopolitical tug-of-war. But this place—Kashmir—is so much more than a synonym for disputed territory, or a target for trekkers and mountaineers. It is a cultural and culinary junction between the Middle East, China and India; a producer of the world's finest saffron; and a historically inauspicious destination for foreign tourists that is nonetheless known for its hospitality. Enter the British-Indian chef Romy Gill, who, in her cookbook, On the Himalayan Trail, takes us inside her journeys to the Kashmir Valley and Ladakh, offering armchair travelers a glimpse into the kitchens of a formerly protected region. The gorgeous images (nearly one for every recipe!) are a highlight of the book, their palettes rich in food-colors from saffron and cinnamon to the golden-red of Kashmiri chilies that are present in many of these recipes. The region's classics (Muslim Rogan Josh, saturated to an ultra-red with indigenous cockscomb; or steamed Momos from Ladakh) are great jumping-off points. Venture a bit further from the familiar, however, and you'll be treated to the versatile Haakh (Kashmiri spinach), the fiery Dum Oluv (whole potatoes in spicy red gravy) and an entire spectrum of lamb and goat dishes like Ghushtaba (mutton meatballs in yogurt gravy). And that's before even mentioning the array of breads, biscuits and, yes, yak butter tea.

Ethan L. Johns, Associate Editor, Food.com

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$26.46

The minute I saw the title of Claire Saffitz’s latest cookbook, What’s for Dessert, I knew I had to have it. Not only is the title one of my all-time favorite questions to ask (I repeat it constantly whenever I go out to eat or get invited to a dinner party), but it perfectly sums up what readers can expect to find inside this wonderfully thoughtful collection—over 100 different ways to add a “happiness-inducing dessert” to their daily lives. Inspired by the recent pandemic, cookbooks by some of Claire’s favorite pastry chefs and her own love of sweet treats, What’s for Dessert stands out from most other cookbooks because every recipe has been specifically developed and designed with the home baker in mind. This means that “a great number” of the included cookies, cakes, flambées, bars and more can be “made entirely by hand.” In fact, none of the recipes in this cookbook require a stand mixer, and only half require a basic hand mixer. What’s more, the recipes were created through the lens of how much free time, space and budget a home baker might have at their disposal. Each recipe also features a level of difficulty—1 (very easy), 2 (easy) and 3 (moderate)—making this cookbook the perfect buy for bakers of all skill sets, even individuals who are brand new to the world of baking. Readers won’t want to miss Claire’s Blood Orange Pudding Cake, which beautifully combines a sheet cake and soufflé into an easily spoonable treat, and her Blue & White Cookies, a fun and fruity take on the classic Jewish deli staple. I also can’t finish this review without mentioning Claire’s mesmerizing S’mores Pie. Not only does she transform the classic childhood treat into a refined dessert worthy of fancy company, but the velvety homemade marshmallows Claire uses on top of it are so versatile, you’ll want to add them to everything from hot cocoa to flourless chocolate cake. There are truly no other words to describe it than spectacular!

Michelle Baricevic, Online Editorial Coordinator, Food Network Magazine

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$24.99

Andrea Gentl’s debut cookbook, Cooking with Mushrooms: A Fungi Lover’s Guide to the World’s Most Versatile, Flavorful, Health-Boosting Ingredients, takes us on an extensive tour of all things mushrooms with the perfect balance of knowledge and cooking technique. At first glance, the recipes may sound familiar, such as lasagna and risotto, but the ingredients and flavors are as unexpected as they are delicious. Make sure to try the Mushroom Ceviche Tostadas with beech mushrooms, which have a texture reminiscent of squid. And the Mushroom Chocolate Chunk Cookies (yep, cookies!) utilize shiitake mushroom powder and a homemade miso nut butter, truly packing an umami punch in each bite. If you still aren't persuaded enough, Andrea is an award-winning food and travel photographer, and her beautiful photos of the nearly 100 recipes prove how talented she is. Whether you’re a fungi lover or mushroom newbie, Cooking with Mushrooms will expand your idea of how to use mushrooms as both a food and a flavor, a seasoning and the star of the plate.

Amanda Neal, Recipe Developer

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$35.99

Budmo means "cheers" in Ukrainian, but it is the exclamation point at the end of this book's title that best captures the enthusiasm behind its delightful collection of Eastern European recipes. Before the pandemic, San Francisco photographer Anna Voloshyna hosted pop-up dinners that celebrated the varenyky (AKA pierogi) and khachapuri (cheese-stuffed Georgian flatbread) of the region where she grew up. And almost everything here, from her dazzling magenta Beet Pickled Deviled Eggs to her grandmother's Chicken Soup with Hand-Cut Noodles beckons the reader, Come, sit, stay… let me feed you. Anna writes that there is a flow of dishes in a Eastern European feast—from cold to hot, from lighter to heartier. But I could make a full meal of the starters, salads and spreads in her first chapter alone: plump Georgian Eggplant Rolls stuffed with walnuts, cilantro, coriander and fenugreek, pickled-studded Vegetarian Russian Potato Salad, and Summer Squash Spread made vibrant orange with a purée of carrots and garden vegetables—all filling and beautiful. Befitting a book of recipes meant for sharing and entertaining, make-ahead and storage instructions accompany almost every dish. I plan on giving this book to several people this holiday season—and I'm slipping an extra copy in the cart for myself as well.

Lygeia Grace, Culinary Editorial Director

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$32.50

California Soul, by the award-winning chef, author and restaurateur Tanya Holland, is a touching and remarkable story of African American influences on California cuisine. Tanya’s book is filled with pages of delicious, seasonally focused recipes like Honey-Kumquat-Glazed Fresh Ham and Peach and Pecan Clafoutis, all celebrating the flavors brought to California by Black Southerners. Throughout, Holland weaves inspiring stories from modern Black culinary entrepreneurs, including winemakers, brewers and farmers. We are guided through the four seasons the book is divided into with Fried Artichoke Po’Boys, Barbecued Oysters with Bacon-Vinegar Mignonette and so many more delectable recipes. California Soul is filled with evocative pictures that uniquely capture breathtaking landscapes, vibrant food and, perhaps most impactfully, a sense of humanity that is genuine and deeply moving. With a beautifully written foreword by Alice Walker, and lyrical narratives of food, community and people, Tanya has created a book that is literary in nature—a work of culinary art that will be sitting in my kitchen, dog-eared and annotated, for many years to come. Cozy up with one of Tanya’s fluffy Sweet Potato Buttermilk Pull-Apart Rolls and dive into these pages that are sure to warm and brighten any cookbook lover’s shelf.

Meg Adler, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$29.37

Ken Forkish wants artisan pan breads to have their moment. The author of Flour Water Salt Yeast, a 2013 James Beard award-winning bread book that focused on Dutch-oven loaves and pizza, Ken writes here about versatile and efficient artisan bread doughs that can be baked in a pan loaf or a Dutch oven. People who became experts on Dutch-oven loaves during the pandemic and new bread-makers looking to have a unique repertoire will be equally excited about Evolutions in Bread. In it, Ken details the same bread basics as his earlier work, such as dough-making techniques and wheatberry structure, and adds new recipes and information about flour and equipment. While seasoned bakers might want to begin with The 50% Einkorn Bread and 100% Spelt Pan Bread, Ken recommends first-timers start with The Standard or White Bread recipes. A table of contents within the recipe chapter shows what style of baking vessel each dough works in, making this book even more user friendly. It will surely inspire a home-baking pan-loaf renaissance.

Sam Marcus, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$36.00

From the moment I picked up Delectable, I was ready to fill my offset spatula with mountains of chocolate buttercream and start frosting one of Claudia Fleming’s decadent Devil’s Food Cakes with Earl Grey Cream. After 20 years, Claudia Fleming—the James Beard award-winning pastry chef and author of The Last Course—has gifted home bakers with something so sweet and absolutely (I can’t help it) delectable. Dedicating a chapter to Savories, including Shiitake Sticky Buns (a mushroom/sticky bun match of our dreams), along with chapters devoted to breakfasts and breads, custards and semifreddos, fruit and so much more, this book has all of your sweet and savory cravings covered. The photos in Delectable capture the beautiful depths and intricacies of Claudia’s dessert world, drawing our eyes to sprinkles of sugar on doughnuts, ripples of frosting on cakes and vibrant seasonal fruits atop flaky tarts. Trade bouquets of flowers as centerpieces at your next dinner party for Claudia’s Squash Blossom Tart (edible garden magic!), and start stocking up on her Sugared Pine Nuts as your new pantry staple. This book is absolutely perfect for any and every home baker in your life.

Meg Adler, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$35.00

After realizing how limited the existing resources on Parsi food were, Farokh Talati—currently Head Chef at St. John Bread and Wine in London—was inspired to write Parsi—a collection of stories and recipes that reflect the history of this Zoroastrian community, which in the seventh century sailed to India after fleeing religious persecution in what is Iran today (then Persia). Given a lack of Parsi restaurants outside of India, Farokh opened a Parsi pop-up called Soho Parsi Curry Night in a basement in London that continued until 2020. And with Parsi, Farokh wants to celebrate his Parsi heritage with a wider audience through its culture and food—what he describes as most heavily influenced by India and Persia but also Portuguese, British and French food. That diverse culinary tradition is filled with saffron, cinnamon, meat, eggs and dal, and balances spicy, sour and sweet flavors. Farokh shares his recipe for Dhansak Masala, an all-purpose spice mix, and Sprouting Lentil Salad, which is typically made for Zoroastrian celebrations of Nowruz (Persian New Year on the spring equinox). Many recipes were passed down through Farokh’s family, such as his uncle Meherji’s Parsi Marghi No Ras, a Parsi-Style Chicken Curry. Most ingredients in the book are available at Asian markets and Farokh includes substitutions for items that are trickier to find. Parsi is sure to captivate any food lover on your holiday gift list.

Sam Marcus, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$21.00

For Gaby Dalkin, known for her fresh and flavor-packed crowd-pleasing recipes, this book is a reset in her approach to cooking to reflect her (and everyone's) shift in priorities. With a growing family, and the urge to make up as much lost time with friends and family as possible, Gaby asked herself how she could still make the food she loves, but make it even faster and with greater ease. This book is the abundant answer to that question, packed with recipes that rely on Gaby's time-savers but don't skimp on her favorite flavors. For instance, Buffalo Cauliflower Bowls take just one simple spin through the oven on a sheet pan, and then you're prepped with lunches for the week. Her Easy Side of Salmon with Tomatoes and Basil is dreamy for a dinner party—meaning, you'll be dreaming about how an impressive dish can come together in only 15 minutes. Plus Gaby devotes an entire section to "the ultimates"—her favorite go-tos with a simplified spin, like a one-bowl focaccia you'll want to turn into a Sunday tradition.

Lauren Piro, Editorial Director

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$27.99

When college and careers separated Bill, Judy, Sarah and Kaitlin Leung in 2011, the tight-knit multigenerational Chinese-American family stayed connected through food —texts, photos and recipes—which gave birth to their wildly popular blog Woks of Life. Eleven years later, their long-awaited book The Woks of Life: Recipes to Know and Love from a Chinese American Family continues those conversations and celebrates the Leungs’ philosophy on food. From a grandmother's kitchen in Shanghai to a family-run Chinese takeout spot in the Catskills to a modern-day home in suburban New Jersey, we learn tips, tricks and recipes from all four family members, each of whom has a slightly different but equally valuable viewpoint on Chinese cuisine. Most importantly, they have a lot of fun along the way and imbue this book with engaging stories and anecdotes as well as information on essential tools, pantry ingredients and helpful techniques. If you want to create dim sum classics like Pork and Shrimp Siu Mai or Chinese American take-out favorites such as Chicken Chow Fun, you’ll find them here. There are also plenty of vegetable-forward recipes (Fast Sizzled Cucumber Salad is my new go-to side!) and popular Chinese home-cooked dishes, including mom Judy’s favorite — Tomato Egg Stir-Fry. Whether you’re new to Chinese cooking or ready to take your skills to the next level, this information-packed, heart-warming book has something for everyone.

Amy Stevenson, Recipe Developer

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$19.49

I knew I was going to absolutely adore Reem Assil’s new cookbook, Arabiyya: Recipes From the Life of an Arab in Diaspora, from the moment she explains that “arabiyya” translates literally to “Arab woman.” Like Reem, who has Palestinian and Syrian roots, my love of cooking stems from and was fostered by the Arab (and non-Arab) women in my family. “The recipes that get handed down to us, from generation to generation, are like treasure maps and time capsules all at once,” Reem writes. This universal truth about food, regardless of culture, is at the heart of her inaugural tome. Filled with delicious Middle Eastern recipes, Arabiyya modernizes traditional Arab cuisine while celebrating its ancient roots. The extensive bread section, for example, illustrates how important bread is to the Arab culinary experience, acting as both nourishment and utensils. Reem’s advice on setting up a proper Arab spice collection is also handy, offering helpful substitutions and explaining what makes each particular spice “so magical.” The owner of Reem’s California Bakery and Kitchen out of Oakland and San Francisco is an activist who uses food to fight for social justice and build stronger communities. In Reem’s view, recipes "show us the ways in which those before us navigated the conditions of their lives and persevered." Pointing to a history of racism in food accessibility, she also sees food as triumph, writing: "Still, we learned how to navigate these roadblocks both because of and in spite of them.” You'll want to share this book—and Reem's warmth and wisdom—with all the curious and conscious cooks in your circle.

Khalil Hymore, Food Network Test Kitchen

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$20.32

Aren't we all dreaming of someone who can help us get dinner on the table quickly, with not too many ingredients—but also with a dash of creativity and flair? Enter recipe developer and food stylist Ali Slagle and her debut cookbook, I Dream of Dinner (so You Don't Have To): Low-Effort, High-Reward Recipes. Known and loved as a contributor to The New York Times, Bon Appetit and Washington Post (to name a few), Ali offers 150 unique dishes that take 45 minutes or less to make and use no more than 10 ingredients (usually fewer), organized around eight main ingredients — from eggs and vegetables to poultry and sea creatures. Each chapter is broken down further by loose — often whimsical — techniques, such as "brown, bother, repeat," "cook quicker (or not at all)" or "let them slouch." She puts a spin on conventional recipe writing by dropping the complicated prep-heavy ingredient list and encouraging her readers to follow along in the method as they prepare and cook the ingredients step by step. She provides plenty of swaps, flexibility, tips and suggestions for tweaking the recipes to make them work for anyone. With playful recipes such as Coconut Curry with Swirled Eggs, Lentil Soup on Spring Break and Snappy Veg with Broken Caesar, this book will make dinner fun again.

Rebecca Fisher, Recipe Editor

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$29.49

In what she describes as “part memoir, part manual, part travel guide,” Cynthia Shanmugalingam writes about her family — she was raised in London by immigrant parents and visited her ancestral country on childhood holidays — in the context of Sri Lanka’s delicious and diverse food and the country’s history of colonial oppression and war. In one of nine short essays in Rambutan: Recipes from Sri Lanka, Cynthia persuades her readers to cook with fresh curry leaves by expertly intertwining details about the curry leaf plant with an emotional story about her grandmother fleeing war-torn Sri Lanka in the late 80s. In another essay, she discusses the variety of Sri Lankan sambols (unpickled condiments and side dishes), for which she later shares recipes, including one for bright, salad-like Green Mango Sambol. Other essays in the book detail the abundance of fruits in Sri Lanka (including the book's namesake) and her family memories connected to food. Thanks to a detailed manual on coconut-cracking, dishes that use fresh grated coconut, such as Roast Beetroot Dry Varai Curry, are not the least bit intimidating. Indeed, the recipes are meant to be easy — except for the Jaffna Crab Curry, which even Cynthia says is difficult, but is absolutely worth making as it is possibly the most delicious dish in the book. And because half of the recipes in Rambutan are vegan, any cook will love having this book. I am totally tempted to take a special trip to London when Cynthia’s restaurant, also called Rambutan, opens. ("Coming soon" according to her Instagram feed!)

Sam Marcus, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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