Ginger Ale

Total Time:
49 hr 18 min
Prep:
15 min
Inactive:
49 hr
Cook:
3 min

Yield:
about 2 quarts
Level:
Easy

Ingredients
Directions

Place the ginger, sugar, and 1/2 cup of the water into a 2-quart saucepan and set over medium-high heat. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat, cover and allow to steep for 1 hour.

Pour the syrup through a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl, pressing down to get all of the juice out of the mixture. Chill quickly by placing over and ice bath and stirring or set in the refrigerator, uncovered, until at least room temperature, 68 to 72 degrees F.

Using a funnel, pour the syrup into a clean 2-liter plastic bottle and add the yeast, lemon juice and remaining 7 cups of water. Place the cap on the bottle, gently shake to combine and leave the bottle at room temperature for 48 hours. Open and check for desired amount of carbonation. It is important that once you achieve your desired amount of carbonation that you refrigerate the ginger ale. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks, opening the bottle at least once a day to let out excess carbonation.


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4.2 59
Added extra ginger and Loved the recipe! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I had to make it twice, since I forgot about my first batch for two weeks and it came out tasting like watered down vodka. The second bottle was delicious, though! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Just followed the recipe without modification and got a tasty ginger ale with the heat I was looking for. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Could have been an awesome probiotic recipe accompanied by the science of fermentation and its health benefits. The Food Network has seriously neglected this aspect of food preparation. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Tastes great, I let my ginger and sugar mixture steep a overnight and reheat the next morning, also used Red Star Champagne yeast for a crisp tasting ginger ale. item not reviewed by moderator and published
We love this recipe but make it in glass jugs item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is a great recipe! I tried using a tad less yeast today when I made it to see if there'll be less of a yeasty flavor this time. But it's not bad...at least if I go by how much my husband loves it! item not reviewed by moderator and published
It's been about a day, and a half out of the two, and I'm seeing whitish brown sediment on the bottom of the bottle, and more floating at the top (sinking if you tap the bottle), or little globules floating in suspension either on their way up, or down, what is this? Is it just the yeast, or something else? It looks nasty whatever it is, is this safe to drink, or did I screw something up? I made one other batch, but other than a tiny amount of the "stuff" on the bottom it didn't do this, however it just tasted like raw bread dough with a hint of ginger, I think I screwed it up so this is my second try, but the bottle looks like a toxic waste dump. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I can't imagine bread yeast being good. Why not use a clean fermenting ale yeast or even a wine yeast? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I tried this and was very happy with the outcome...really yummy : And we did things all organic and did not use plastic... item not reviewed by moderator and published
Do you release any pressure from the bottle while it's fermenting, before you place it in the fridge? I'm worried about my glass bottles shattering item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used a glass bottle and it was fine. I think you would have to seriously neglect it for the glass to shatter item not reviewed by moderator and published
If using glass bottles for this (or any other naturally carbonating drink); you should always use bottles that are conditioned for pressure and temperature fluctuations. Milk bottles, beer bottles (especially the "Grolsch" style with re-sealable caps) and of course any canning jars will work. Just be certain to have a method and schedule for allowing excessive carbonation to off-gas from the vessel. Higher ambient temperature yields more active and faster carbonation so be mindful of the area. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I meant to say, also, that I used twice the amount of ginger this time since I love a pretty strong ginger flavor coming through...you know, more like Vernor's, ha! I like to use the strained ginger, too. I let it sit in water for awhile to make me a cup or 2 of ginger tea...or I just eat the sweet ginger pieces, kind of like candy. Well, what can I say, I'm a fan of ginger! item not reviewed by moderator and published
sounds like your yeast is no longer active (alive) item not reviewed by moderator and published

Not what you're looking for? Try:

Raspberry Ginger Ale Punch

Recipe courtesy of Paula Deen