Camp Cutthroat Canteen: Disaster-Proof Your Pancakes

Learn the secrets to turning out the best, fluffiest pancakes.

Photo By: Eddy Chen ©2016, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Disaster-Proof Your Pancakes

Don't be sabotaged by breakfast; stick with these go-to tips to turn out light, fluffy pancakes every time.

Why You Should Mix Your Dry Ingredients Before the Wet

Use a whisk or a fork to combine your dry ingredients thoroughly before you add in the wet to make sure every bite is perfectly seasoned.

Why You Shouldn’t Overmix Your Batter

Overmixed batter makes tough pancakes, so mix only until your batter just comes together. Don’t worry if there are some lumps.

Why You Should Always Use a Hot Skillet

To avoid undercooked pancakes, let your skillet get nice and hot before adding pancake batter — if a drop of water dances across the surface, it’s ready to go.

Why You Should Use Oil, Not Butter

Use a paper towel to wipe a thin film of oil across the surface of your griddle or skillet. Oil, rather than butter, gives you the perfect amount of fat with less risk of burning.

Why You Should Use Your Batter Right Away

Fluffy pancakes come from fresh batter, so mix yours right before you plan to use it, and don’t let it sit too long.

Why You Should Pay Attention to the Bubbles

When your pancakes develop surface bubbles that break and stay open, it’s time to flip.

Why You Should Add Mix-Ins During Cooking

Mix in delicate additions, like chocolate chips or berries, during cooking once bubbles form on the surface of your pancakes. This will ensure that they stay in one piece. (Hardier mix-ins, like bananas, can go right into the batter.)

Why You Should Flip Only Once

Pancakes need to be flipped only once. More flips and you risk overcooking, thus toughening them up.

Why You Should Serve Right Away

For the best taste and texture, it’s best to serve pancakes straight from the skillet, but if you can’t, spread them on a baking sheet and keep them warm in a low-temperature oven. Avoid stacking — that makes them tough!

Why You Should Let Your Butter and Syrup Warm Up

Take your butter and syrup out of the fridge when you start mixing your batter so they won’t be ice-cold when they hit the pancakes.

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