Good Eats Roast Turkey

Total Time:
9 hr 45 min
Prep:
15 min
Inactive:
7 hr
Cook:
2 hr 30 min

Yield:
10 to 12 servings
Level:
Easy

Ingredients
  • 1 (14 to 16 pound) frozen young turkey
  • For the brine:
  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 gallon vegetable stock
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons allspice berries
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped candied ginger
  • 1 gallon heavily iced water
  • For the aromatics:
  • 1 red apple, sliced
  • 1/2 onion, sliced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 cup water
  • 4 sprigs rosemary
  • 6 leaves sage
  • Canola oil
Directions
Watch how to make this recipe. 2 to 3 days before roasting:
  • Begin thawing the turkey in the refrigerator or in a cooler kept at 38 degrees F.

  • Combine the vegetable stock, salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, allspice berries, and candied ginger in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Stir occasionally to dissolve solids and bring to a boil. Then remove the brine from the heat, cool to room temperature, and refrigerate.

  • Early on the day or the night before you'd like to eat:

  • Combine the brine, water and ice in the 5-gallon bucket. Place the thawed turkey (with innards removed) breast side down in brine. If necessary, weigh down the bird to ensure it is fully immersed, cover, and refrigerate or set in cool area for 8 to 16 hours, turning the bird once half way through brining.

  • Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Remove the bird from brine and rinse inside and out with cold water. Discard the brine.

  • Place the bird on roasting rack inside a half sheet pan and pat dry with paper towels.

  • Combine the apple, onion, cinnamon stick, and 1 cup of water in a microwave safe dish and microwave on high for 5 minutes. Add steeped aromatics to the turkey's cavity along with the rosemary and sage. Tuck the wings underneath the bird and coat the skin liberally with canola oil.

  • Roast the turkey on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F for 30 minutes. Insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Set the thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees F. A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting. Let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil or a large mixing bowl for 15 minutes before carving.


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Pairs Well With
Pinot Noir

Delicate, floral red wine

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4.9 5391
The best item not reviewed by moderator and published
The turkey was a beautiful golden brown and delicious.  However, when I placed the turkey on the bottom rack at 500 degrees for 30 minutes, withe the stove vent on high, the house filled with smoke to the extent we had to open every door and window.  Has anyone else experienced this?<br /><br />My low rating is based on the smoke-out.<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thank you Alton!! Cooked this on Thanksgiving major hit!!!! Amazingly Moist and great flavor! <div>Will cook again!!</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thank you Alton for this amazing recipe! Four years ago when I wanted to roast my first turkey I didn't know where to begin, but the straight-forward nature of this recipe and the scientific explanation of the steps had won me over and I gave it a shot. That was a huge success, and I had not stopped since - every year I have to do my Turkey! This year I have successfully handled a 20lb-er. Friends and family said "professional grade" turkey! So, THANK YOU Alton! item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>Rookie question, I have a Convection Roast, Convection Bake and regular Bake setting on my oven. Should I use the Convection Roast for the first 30 minutes at 500 degrees and then switch to Bake @ 350 degrees? Any recommendations/Help would be greatly appreciated on which oven settings I should use. Thank you in advance!</span><br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used this cooking method without brine on a 17 lb bird. Turned out perfect! Was done in about 2.5-3 hours including 30 min roast time.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wow...cannot compete with over 5,000 reviews... but this recipe is spectacular!!!!! I thought I made a pretty good turkey prior to trying this recipe, but this is crazy amazing! I urge all to try it. Watch Alton's turkey videos for extra pointers (i.e. the Turkey triangle) and read other reviewers for extra tips. I followed Altons recipe exactly as written and it  is amazing!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great recipe item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was the first year I was responsible for the Thanksgiving turkey.  I used this recipe with a 19 pound bird and it turned out amazing.  Moist, succulent and flavorful.  It had all of my guests raving.  I will be following this recipe every year.  Thanks Alton!<div><br /></div><div>(Be sure to watch the linked videos for tips that aren't specifically detailed in the recipe.  They made my first time handling the turkey a lot easier.)</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Best turkey ever! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Help!! I've used this recipe for two years now and the first year the bottom part of the turkey wasn't cooked when the thermometer read 161, even with resting. This year I let it sit for an hr with foil and still it was uncooked. The meat is pink and squishy. Could it be my roasting pan? What am I doing wrong? <div><br /></div><div>The breast was good though, super tender and flavorful! </div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
When I saw that this was the #1 recipe on the Food Network, I just HAD to try it.  I've made turkeys in the past, but NEVER as great as this one!!!!  Last night, we left this turkey out for a few hours after we ate, and when my husband went to pick what was left off the bones, he said it was STILL moist and juicy!!!  EVERYONE LOVED IT AND SAID IT WAS THE BEST! Then I revealed my secret, that it was all Alton's doing.  Thanks, Alton, for making me look like I've known my way around a turkey for years! :)  Also, you are SO right about the stuffing drying out the turkey if it's in the cavity.  I never realized that was my mistake until I watched one of your videos explaining this.  Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU!!!!  I will never make turkey any other way again.  Every step, from the brining to the foil triangle on the turkey breast, was worth the time!  You are the BEST COOK EVER, ALTON!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
This was my first time making a Thanksgiving turkey, so I was pretty nervous. I am thanking my lucky stars that I found this recipe! The turkey came out perfect! It was juicy, the flavor was delicious, and it was beautifully roasted. Everyone loved it! Thank you, Alton! item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is my second year using this recipe. Both times I have been thrilled with the results, although I did have a small issue this time. I cooked as directed to a breast temp of 161, but this happened much faster than estimated (2 hours for a 19 pound turkey). I turned down the temp and kept the bird in the oven because I needed all the sides to catch up. When we finally carved the turkey, the dark meat was pink as were the juices. My family freaked and insisted I put the turkey back in the oven. I ate some of the 'pink' dark meat before returning to oven with no issues. Could the brIne have affected the color of the meat and the juices? It all ended up fine but for the future I'd like to know if I need to check thigh temp in addition to the breast temp as instructed - especially considering I cooked past the point of 161 in the breast. Thanks!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I starting making this about 5 years ago and my Son said "This is the best Turkey I ever ate!" So I have made it every year since and it is the best Turkey I ever ate too!  I think the secret is not just the brine but the 500 degree for 30 minutes to crisp the skin to a golden color.  Nice job Alton.  :)  item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is the second year that I followed this recipe. I am very happy with the results. I have one nuisance problem though. When I go through the 30 minute high heat phase, the drippings on the baking sheet start to throw a noticable amount of smoke from the oven. My oven and the sheet are clean. I was judicious with the Canola Oil. Any thoughts? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I made this recipe today for Thanksgiving.  I used digital thermometer probe and it came out perfect.  I made a rosemary rub and rubbed it both on top of  the skin and under.  The picky eaters in my family even tried it and loved it.   item not reviewed by moderator and published
Made this turkey for Thanksgiving. I knew making an Alton Brown recipe would be amazing but I never dreamed it would be so incredible! The bird was done in two hours and the white meat was drippingly moist. It was unreal! Thank you Alton!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
The method used to season and cook this turkey is AMAZING!  You end up with a beautiful looking and tender tasting turkey.  This was a big hit for my family and I will continue to make it this way for years to come I'm sure.  Oh yeh, no need to rinse the brine off the bird.  I didn't and it was not too salty, more like just right. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Any advice for stuffing the turkey? item not reviewed by moderator and published
So if I take it out at 161 in the breast, the dark meat will be 180 because it is not rented? item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>I have used this recipe since it came out. Never have i had a better tasting, tender juicer  bird. I have done 20 pounders that took about 3 hours, and 24 pounders that took about 3.25. my 28 pound took 4. make sure your thermometer is properly inserted into the thickest part,and not touching any bones or poking through .  if you are unsure of your thermometer test it measuring the temperature of ice water, or boiling water. Happy Thanksgiving all.</span> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I need help if anyone is out there. I have a 19-lb. bird, and I brined and cooked for 30 min at 500 as directed. I'm not 30 minutes into cooking at 350 and the thermometer is registering white meat at 161+ degrees. That can't be possible with a bird this big. I changed the battery in the thermometer just in case - no dice. Any thoughts on what to do? There is no way the dark meat is done. I don't even think the white meat should be done. Help!<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
20lb Turkey has been in for An hour and 45 minutes and is already reading 161 degrees.  It's a new oven and thermometer so I don't have any reason to believe either one is broken. Could it really be ready? item not reviewed by moderator and published
By far the best turkey recipe I have ever tried. EVERYONE goes crazy for how moist the turkey is. This is a Thanksgiving staple for me. Alton Brown is the only one I trust with my turkey :) item not reviewed by moderator and published
This has been a perfect recipe year after year when followed exactly! Watch the video though to see when to add the double layered breast shield-right after browning but shaped before the bird ever goes in. Pitfalls-I once failed to rinse (I just let it drain) the bird after the brine-super salty gravy! I once used ground allspice for the brine ingredient vs whole berries-way too alspicy ! The temperasure is key and keep things clean. You will not cook a turkey  any other way after trying this method! item not reviewed by moderator and published
fdgfg item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>Brine-Rinse-Crisp-Cook with shield-Remove@161degrees The best combination ever. The Brine and Shield is the secret to the success.</span> item not reviewed by moderator and published
This version of the recipe seems to have omitted covering the breast with a double layer of foil upon reducing oven temp. that was in the original episode/DVD recipe booklet. Have used this recipe for years because it works perfectly. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I use Alton Brown's directions for roasting the turkey but Emeril's brined turkey recipe which I love. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/brined-and-roasted-turkey-recipe.html<div>The turkey shield is a must. Watching the video helps.</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
What about basting? Does this come out ok without it? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Do you put the cinnamon stick into the cavity as well?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Do I need to put foil on the turkey to keep it from burning for the rest of the cooking time after I roasted it 30min @ 500°? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Not sure yet....still in the oven!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Turned out wonderful but cooked quicker than I planned for. How can I keep it from drying out until time to eat? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Any suggestions for cooking time at 500 degrees for a 20lb bI'd? should I stick with 30 minutes? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have an 11 pound turkey. How long should I cook it for?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Perfect every year!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Comes out great every year :)  item not reviewed by moderator and published
If I only have 6-7hours to brine will my turkey still turn out good?? It is 22lbs. I REALLY want to use this recipe! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have an 18lb turkey, how long should I cook it for? Can I use a roasting pan instead of a half sheet pan? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Amazing recipe.  However this was the first year I wasn't able to buy salted vegetable stock. Does anyone know how much salt I need to add to unsalted stock? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I bought a Trader Joe's turkey that claims it was already brined in salt water basically.  Has anyone ever bought one of these and do you recommend brining it more?  I'm not sure if I can be confident in their brining or not,... anyone have experience with this turkey and brand from Trader Joe's? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Every year my wife had me put the turkey in a turkey bag and it always came out dry 4 years ago I found this recipe and have never had dry turkey to this day. item not reviewed by moderator and published
If the brine doesn't cover the bird, fill little Tupperware containers full of water, close tight and put them in the cavity of the turkey or wherever they fit. This will let you cover the bird with the brine without watering it down or making extra brine. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I don't have a half sheet pan, can I use a roasting pan? Will this affect taste, color and/or time? item not reviewed by moderator and published
The allspice berries were not available at my grocery store.  Is there a substitute or can I get away with not using it at all? item not reviewed by moderator and published
 Would this is brine with the amount of salt in it be too much for a 12 pound turkey since the recipe calls for a 14 to 16 pound turkey?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Any tips for an Electric roaster?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have an 18 lbs turkey, will these measurements be okay? Or do i need to increase? If so by how much? This will be my first time brining my turkey :) item not reviewed by moderator and published
Just put the turkey in the brine! Excited to see how it comes out.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Do you cover the turkey with foil to keep moisture in after you turn the oven down to 350?? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Boiling the brine now! I hope it comes out amazing! :) item not reviewed by moderator and published
Trying to get as much done in advance as I can. Made my own chicken stock so I can make the gravy ahead of time. (I also know the drippings from a brined turkey can be too salty for my family). But with all the allspice, brown sugar and ginger in the brine- how much does that affect overall taste of the turkey? Would a standard poultry gravy work with this turkey? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Do I have to go right from taking the turkey out of the brine to putting it into the oven (after adding aromatics and canola oil)?? What can I do if there is extra time? And how will it affect the turkey? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've made this turkey for the last ten years. It's absolutely delicious! I've changed it slightly for us Floridians. I add the juice of an orange off of my tree (plus the orange) to the brine. I also use a half of an orange (cut into wedges) for the aromatic. Good Eats! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Making this tomorrow. I have high hopes item not reviewed by moderator and published
Brine and Temperature questions <div>So the brine recipe calls for adding 1 gallon of ice water....I'll be brining my 10 pound turkey inside an oven bag in the refrigerator.  Do I still need to add the 1 gallon of ice water??? I don't want to water down the brine flavor but don't want to leave it overpowering either. Suggestions?</div><div><br /></div><div>This recipe calls for removing your turkey from the oven when the breast temp probe reads 161 degrees but an updated version calls for 155.  Anyone tried that lower temp? I'm concerned that the dark meat will be too undercooked if I pull at 155.  Maybe pick the average of 158? I don't want dry white meat either....</div><div><br /></div><div>And has anyone used refined coconut oil instead of canola? Ive used it to fry steak and it seems fine, no taste.  I have EVOO or corn oil too.....butter too but figured that would give off some smoking which I'm trying to avoid. </div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
To Brine or Not to Brine? I purchased a frozen young turkey. Just before I went to brine it, I noticed the package said "Contains up to a 8% solution of turkey broth, salt, sugar and flavorings." Can anyone tell me if I can brine it and if so for how long? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I'm using a Trader Joes Brined young turkey. Can I skip the extra brining? item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is the best turkey recipe ever.  I will never cook a turkey any other way.  Thank you so much, AB! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Just found out I'm in charge of the turkey!!! long story...anyways...My local grocery store only has the actual rosemary plant (do i just cut off 4 sprigs?) and they"re out of sage leaves...can i substitute with ground sage? If so, how do I convert that? :o/<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
 If I am making a 24 pound turkey should I follow the same brine recipe?  Or do I need to add more of the ingredients listed? Thanks! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've been making it every year for the past 10 years.  I wish he would give timings for other sized turkeys.  I have a 21 lb Turkey.  How long?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I already made my brine with iodized table salt because it's all I had. I used 3/4c based on an online guide, will this be okay or should I start over? item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>I've never brined a turkey before, but I'm ready to go with this one. Just wondering the timing on brining? For instance, if I put it in brine before bed at say midnight and want to cook at say 2 pm, then that's 14 hours. Alton says 8-16 hours, but I'm wondering if the longer time is getting to be too long? If I start the brine in the morning, is it long enough? Can the turkey come out of the brine an hour or two before cooking if I put it in the night before, or does it need to go from brine to oven? Thanks!</span> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I only have a 9lb turkey how does this change cook time item not reviewed by moderator and published
Can anyone advise if the ice serves any purpose other than keeping the bird at a good temp while in the bucket? I plan on brining mine in a bag while in the fridge, so assuming the ice isn't necessary.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
This my 4th time making this recipe and my family loves it!!!!! Every thanksgiving they always ask me to cook the turkey because it was flavorful and moist. Make sure you do exactly what Alton Brown says from preparing to cooking it. Watch the old video he made and you will have a great and tasteful turkey! Thanks Alton for making this great recipe. Happy gobble gobble!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Can I sub ground ginger for candied  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Great recipe. Did this last year, and I intend to do it tomorrow.  Brine is the way to go.   item not reviewed by moderator and published
How should I change the cooking times for a 20 lb turkey? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Can I use this recipe (minus the aromatics) and stuff the turkey? What if I stuff the turkey with a hot, partially cooked stuffing? Please give a reason for your answer - I like to know "the why" something works or doesn't work. Thanks! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have made this recipe 6 times with great success. The only complaint comes from my wife, who says the drippinga are too salty and as a result, the gravy is too salty. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Use a cooking bag or not? First time turkey maker lol  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Question: am I supposed  boil until the peppercorns and allspice berries are completely dissolved?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Does brining effect the cook time? 2.5 hours seems really quick.  I'm used to the 15-20 mins per pound rule item not reviewed by moderator and published
Can I use chicken broth instead of vegetable stock? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I haven't tried this yet...Was wondering if I brine it and then rinsed it can I then leave it in the fridge for a few hours before cooking it?  I thought I read somewhere that this would help the crispiness of the skin....but I cant find that info again..thanks item not reviewed by moderator and published
Is salted or unsalted vegetable stock better?<div>Can you use chicken stock instead??</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
When it says to add the steeped aromatics does that mean to add the apple, cinnamon and water to the turkey cavity or just the water?  please help item not reviewed by moderator and published
My second time using this! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Is it okay to use chicken instead of vegetable broth? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used this recipe last year and it was the best(only) turkey I've ever made. And by far the greatest one I've ever eaten. Since then I've became vegan and have not had any meat in over 6 months. I'm marking a turkey for my family using this recipe and I'm really thinking about tasting it. :-( item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used Alton's brine recipe with Sunny Anderson's brining METHOD.  Then back to Alton for baking instructions.  Result... Greatest Turkey EVER!!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Quick question about the water.  Is it one gallon of water then add ice or is a total of 1 gallon of ice water?  Thanks item not reviewed by moderator and published
My mother is diabetic so we don't want to use brown sugar or candied ginger. Would that be ok? or should I just look for another recipe?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Perfect turkey every time ! item not reviewed by moderator and published
First-time making turkey.  Question:  How to follow Alton's instructions --&gt; with innards removed?<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
what type of onion is suggested? And vegetable BROTH or STOCK?!<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
canola oil Can I use olive oil instead of canola? item not reviewed by moderator and published
This might be a silly question but I'm confused about adding the aromatics: does the 1 cup of water go into the bird's cavity along with the steeped aromatics and herbs? Or is the steeping water discarded? Thank you! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Delicious, easy - pretty foolproof.  I usually use a countertop roaster, to keep the oven free for other things. Cooks a little bit faster than Alton's times.<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
What would you suggest using to brine in for a 25 lb. turkey?  I normally use a 5 gallon bucket from the hardware store, but I think with such a large bird this year it will be too small.  Any suggestions? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I bought a butter ball all premium turkey, can I still brine my turkey I read a comment below where someone said to skip the brine! Please help  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've made this recipe for the past 7 or 8 years. It is the only way I'll eat turkey. It has worked perfectly every year except when I used multicolored peppercorns in the brine. Turns out the dye they use to make the red peppercorns will leach into your turkey meat and make it bright pink. I thought the meat was undercooked but it was just the red dye.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I bought a butterball turkey, will this recipe not work? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have unsalted vegetable stock. Do I need to add more salt, or is the recipe for unsalted vegetable stock? item not reviewed by moderator and published
Does anyone know if I should adjust the amount of the ingredients for the brine for a 23 lb turkey? I've made a 15 lb turkey 3 years in a row and it is AMAZING!!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
i HAVE to stuff my turkey...that shouldn't pose a problem??  so long as my thermometer is set??  I brined a turkey last year just w salted water, but this sounds fabulous...thanks item not reviewed by moderator and published
Are you putting the legs in the back of the oven? It is hotter there. item not reviewed by moderator and published
check placement of the thermometer item not reviewed by moderator and published
Check your oven temperature. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've read on other reviews that if you use the mixed-colored peppercorns (with pink ones in it, too), that this can happen.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I get the same thing too. I just turn on the fan and open the windows before I start to mitigate the smoke issue, but I still get some and it adds the Thanksgiving smell to the whole house. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Add some water to the bottom of the roasting pan and the drippings won't smoke. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Don't because it's too perfect as is.  :)  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I think it's possible.  My Americas Test Kitchen cook book says 400 degrees for a total of an hour and a half.  That's for a 12 to 14 pound unstuffed turkey.  They also say to turn the turkey over during cooking.  Let us know how it turned out. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I went back and repositioned the thermometer, and that bought me some time. But the whole thing was definitely cooked in 2 1/2 hours (and I went past 165 because I was too nervous about undercooking). My biggest concern was the timing, because I timed all of my side dishes to be done 30 minutes after the bird was originally scheduled to come out and this was done well over an hour early. So we just took it out and covered it in foil and hoped for the best. It wasn't super hot, but it was still very moist so that is a win in my book.<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
no it will take 3 hours 16 lb will cook for about 2.5 hours item not reviewed by moderator and published
The white meat will cook fast, mostly the proximity to the heating element. This is where you cover the breast with foil to slow it down a bit. Check where the thigh meets the bird, that's one of the last places to cook. My bird has always cooked ridiculously fast using this recipe (i.e. an hour and a half of so for 18lb). If the temps are good you're fine. You can calibrate your thermometer by filing a glass up with ice, then filling with water. Let it sit a bit and put the thermometer in. Temp should be right at 32deg item not reviewed by moderator and published
I am having the exact same problem (mine was only in 1 hour before it hit 161). Anxious to hear if anyone can help.<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
i personally don't use the meter i have a 23 lb turkey i will cook it for 3 to 3.5 hours. <div>i have cooked a 18 lb turkey for about 2.5 hours very juicy and tasty i cook this recipe every year for the past 5+ years</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
It's possible.  The 500 degree portion speeds up the cooking.  I did a 12 lb bird and it only took an hour past the 30 minute browning time.  I trusted the process and let the bird rest under foil on the counter for 30 minutes before carving, turned out perfect.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Is the omission intentional? item not reviewed by moderator and published
The reason it's omitted now is the USDA reduced their recommendation on the safe temperature of the dark meat from 180 to 161.  If you use the foil, the dark meat will get to 180 and will be the same as the white at around 161 if you don't. <div><br /></div><div>The dark meat will be very moist using the newer method, and the brine will lead some to think it's undercooked due to the extra clear juice that runs out when carved.  If it becomes concerning, use the foil method, otherwise no foil works great. </div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
No need for basting.  The 500˚F cooling time is to give a crispy skin and if you baste you will lose that.  And the brining keeps the turkey moist so no need to baste. Don't forget the heat shield after turning the temp down.  Triangle of foil over the breast.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
No basting needed.  If you follow the directions to the "T" it will come out perfect!   item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes, cinnamon goes in.  Enjoy! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes you do item not reviewed by moderator and published
No, I didn't put foil on it while it was cooking and the color was perfect! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Im at 2 1/2 hours and its only 140 degrees in the breast. item not reviewed by moderator and published
30 minutes will do it for you.  It's for getting the skin crispy.  Then its 8.5 to 9 min per lb at 350. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes, 30 min should still work.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
If you have a thermometer, that's the best way to gauge, cook until the thickest part of the breast reaches 161-165.  Otherwise, you are probably looking around an hour and a half item not reviewed by moderator and published
It will I just brined a 28 lb bird for about 8 hours and it was excellent. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Toss ice cubes straight into the brine when it's done boiling so you won't have to wait to refrigerate it first. I didn't use a gallon of water but a gallon worth of ice cubes instead. item not reviewed by moderator and published
why would you give a 1-star rating just to ask a question? item not reviewed by moderator and published
8.5 to 9 minutes per lb.  Remember the thermometer.   Happy Thanksgiving. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Just follow the recipe. The cup of Kosher will be fine. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Trader Joe's brined turkeys are great - no need to do anything more. Just follow the recipe for roasting. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Many people just omit the berries.<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I would just use ground allspice  item not reviewed by moderator and published
use ground allspice if you don't have the berries, that way you get the flavor.... item not reviewed by moderator and published
It shouldn't make a difference. The turkey will absorb only what it can take in. Just as long as it's immersed fully in the liquid, you're good  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Your going to love it. Happy Thanksgiving. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Make a triangle out of foil and press it on to the breast to form a guard. remove  the foil and bake at 500° for 30 minutes. place  the foil on the breast and lower the  heat to 350° and cook as directed above. the  foil will help prevent the breast meat from over cooking while the dark meat cooks to an internal temp of 161°. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Honestly, I have never been able to taste the allspice and ginger in the finished turkey. The first time I tried this recipe, I worried that the spices would cause the finished turkey to taste strange, but it doesn't. I have used this recipe many tiimes, and I have also left out the spices and chosen to add citrus and fresh herbs instead of the allspice and ginger. The turkey seems to taste the same either way. Your regular gravy should be fine!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thanks! Like someone else said- I was also planning on putting the turkey in a brining bag in the fridge. Cold ice water (1 gallon)  HAS to dilute the brine- right? Should I add extra water to the brine? Someone said no- but water is going to dilute it in the 5 gallon bucket method. Last year I brined a salt-solution turkey and it was in edible. PARANOID about salt now.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
You can leave the turkey in the brine solution until you are ready for the next steps. I have made this recipe on Thanksgiving several years in a row. 16 hours in the brine will not have any negative effects.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I did the same to my brine last night! I'm excited, the citrus adds that extra flavor. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I don't know if my last comment made it. but leave the popup in and use the ice water. item not reviewed by moderator and published
From reading through countless of these posts (literally I've read over 500 of them already) it seems its totally fine to do.  I'm doing it as well.  Just remember to rinse the turkey well after you're done brining. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Not necessary for that kind of bird, but shouldn't hurt it either. item not reviewed by moderator and published
A lot of the turkeys seem to be sold that way. I purchased a turkey beast a while back that was labeled that way, but I still brined it. It turned out great. It makes the difference in a dry bird (or breast in that scenario) and a moist, tender bird.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I think it's fine to brine it.  Why the 3 star rating?  You haven't even tried it yet.   item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes, skip it. Your turkey is already brined.<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
nope.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes. item not reviewed by moderator and published
<div>If your grocery has the poultry seasoning mix in the plastic flat packs you can substitute that for the others.  it should have the rosemary, sage and thyme in it.  I use fresh rosemary, thyme and 1whole garlic sliced in half, 1 onion sliced in half and 1 lemon sliced in half for the cavity.  I leave the peels on since you discard them once done. I also make a lemon butter to rub under the skin on the breasts of the bird.  just be careful not to tear the skin when you do it.  you can check out Ina gardens turkey recipe to see how its done.  Good luck and Happy Thanksgiving!!!</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Add more. The 16 pound turkey that Alton talks about is only 2/3 the total size of yours. 8+8. Yours is 8+8+8=24. Back to elementary math, whew!   Salt is 1 cup (8 oz) for 16 pounds (only 2/3 size of yours) so use 12 oz, or 1 1/2 cups. Sugar is 1/2 cup so use 3/4 cup. You don't need to add more veg/chicken stock, just make sure bird is fully immersed in brine and add extra cold water to do this. Good luck---should be excellent! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I agree, can anyone comment? <div>22 lb turkey here. I'm figuring 30 minutes at 500 degrees, then 8 -10 minutes per pound based on another review) for a total of 3 to 3/2 hours?</div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Actually I just found notes from last year, in my 10 yr old oven it took 4 hours for 20# turkey... item not reviewed by moderator and published
21 pound turkey = 190 minutes-30 minutes @500 means 160 @ 350 so 2:40 @ 350.  If you don't have a probe thermometer, start checking doneness at 1:45.   By the way, if you spatchcock the bird you can cut the time down by about 20%.  This is wht I've done the last two years and not only does it cook faster, since it is flat it frees up oven space for taters and dressing. item not reviewed by moderator and published
<p>Brine time? 20 hours (ish) cook time, depends. But cut and paste from above.</p><p><br /></p><p>Roast the turkey on lowest level of the oven at 500 degrees F for 30 minutes. Insert a probe thermometer into thickest part of the breast and reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. Set the thermometer alarm (if available) to 161 degrees F. A 14 to 16 pound bird should require a total of 2 to 2 1/2 hours of roasting. Let the turkey rest, loosely covered with foil or a large mixing bowl for 15 minutes before carving.</p> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Christine, before I switched to kosher or sea salt, I used regular Morton's iodine salt with the other items for brine. it always came out excellent! No worries---good luck! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've always put it in brine around 4pm.  Start cooking around noon.  If you take it out of the brine and refreigerate for a few hours, I see no problem, as by then the turkey has been brined...it won't "leak" out.  :) item not reviewed by moderator and published
14 hours isn't too long- I typically brine mine for 14-16 hours.  It doesn't need to go from brine-to-oven.  Just make sure you're storing it in the refrigerator or a cool place.<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I generally set mine in the brine 24 hours before I plan on putting in the oven.  Dinner is at 5 which means in the oven at 3 which means I'm boiling the brine right now.  I usually just put an 8lb bag of ice on the bird in the bucket.  (a pint is a pound the world around so 8 lbs = 8 pts = 1 gallon) and then pour the slightly cooled brine over the ice.  Has worked perfectly for 6 years running. item not reviewed by moderator and published
yes, it's to keep at a safe temperature item not reviewed by moderator and published
And I believe it's helps with the brining method since it's a chemical reaction of sorts.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
This is my 7th year doing this recipe, and I always use the wet groud, or sliced fresh.  HAve never found the candied, and too hard to make it item not reviewed by moderator and published
no.  use fresh ginger if you can't find the candied version.  only use ground as a last resort.<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
Go fresh. Works for me. 10years samesame. item not reviewed by moderator and published
It's 30 mins at 500° then 8 to 10 min per pound.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
So a 22 pound turkey should take approx 3 hours - 3 hours, 30 min (including the 30 minutes at 500 degress?)   Just trying to time it correctly with guest arrivals, etc item not reviewed by moderator and published
There is no cooking time.  You simply cook it at 350 degrees until the internal breast temp reaches 161 degrees (or as Alton now suggests, 155 degrees).  The times are merely for planning purposes...never cook by time, only by temperature. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wise. item not reviewed by moderator and published
The stuffing adds mass and thus cooking time so you end up with dryer meat. Stuffing is also a haven for bacteria such as salmonella from the bird so I would avoid if you can. If you like the idea of presenting a stuffed bird on your table I would stuff it after the turkey has rested then serve.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Here's the answer as posted by Alton himself on his blog:<br />http://altonbrown.com/dont-stuff-your-thanksgiving-turkey/<br /><br />In addition, stuffing the turkey increases cooking time and hinders the heat from circulating inside the bird similar to doughnut frying. Donuts have the hole in the center to allow hot oil to fry the pastry quicker, precluding the dough from absorbing too much oil during the frying process and the doughnut becoming soggy and greasy. Similarly, having only a few aromatics inside the cavity allows the bird to cook from the inside, increasing cooking time and preventing the "top" meat from overcooking and drying out before the lower layers have a chance to cook thoroughly. <br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
You can simply dilute the drippings using low sodium chicken or turkey broth as the base, then adding in drippings until desired "unsaltiness" is reached. It works like a charm for me. item not reviewed by moderator and published
No.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Follow his instructions on cooking and it'll be perfect. item not reviewed by moderator and published
No they won't dissolve , just until it boils. When u take out the turkey from the bucket and pat dry it make sure none of the peppercorn or allspice is  on the turkey. :)  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Nope, just the salt and sugar item not reviewed by moderator and published
Thanks for asking. I had the same question and now it has been answered! item not reviewed by moderator and published
No, it's the 30 mins at 500° that shortens the time. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I used chicken broth when I first did this recipe. I have been using it for 5 years now<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
If you oil the skin and follow cooking instructions, the skin will be wonderfully crispy.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
He said use salted broth. I used chicken broth and it still works great. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Salted vegetable stock. He said he used vegetable broth in a very old video but this recipe says vegetable stock. Stock is a lot more flavorful than broth. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I just watched this episode earlier today.  Yes, put the softened apple, onion, and cinnamon stick into the cavity. item not reviewed by moderator and published
You add the apple,  cinnamon ,sage  and rosemary . Not the water. :) I made this turkey last year and it was delicious!!! item not reviewed by moderator and published
We've made this for years, and my husband who makes the brine to definitely make a vegetable one.  He uses Emeril's vegetable stock recipe.  A lot of veggie ingredients, but SO worth it. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Veggie stock is a must!  And we've been making this for years. Well worth it! item not reviewed by moderator and published
You may use chicken stock. It will alter the flavor some, though not necessarily for the worse, merely different. Vegetable is simply preferred in a similar manner to adding fresh vegetables to turkey (celery, carrots, etc). <br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
It's a total of 1 gallon of ice water.   item not reviewed by moderator and published
We've been making this for years once we found out how incredibly moist and delicious this turkey comes out. My husband says he puts in all of the ingredients and the stock, then add enough ice water which should be about a gallon, put the turkey in and make sure the turkey is completely submerged.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
There isn't much sugar left in the bird after the brining process, so I wouldn't worry too much about it.  My wife is diabetic, and I've used this recipe for years with her having no issues. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I'm diabetic and use truvia brown sugar blend. but the sugar is minimal, so it's not like a candied bird. your mom has more to worry about with the potatoes, gravy and dressing... item not reviewed by moderator and published
You remove the neck and gizzard from the cavity once the turkey is thawed<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
He means remove the bagged giblets, etc. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Any onion and either or for the vegetable<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I like yellow onions, and stock tastes a bit better imho....been using this recipe for years. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Salted or unsalted and is chicken stock ok? item not reviewed by moderator and published
I would go for unsalted since the brine will provide enough salt.  Veggie stock is preferred, but chicken should work too.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I have used chicken stock in this for years as I never have vegetable stock.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>Salted or unsalted and is chicken stock ok?</span> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I wouldn't, it smokes at a higher temp and has a flavor. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Sure item not reviewed by moderator and published
I use softened butter or veg spread ;-) but I'm from the south lol item not reviewed by moderator and published
I second butter instead of olive oil.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Discard the steeping water.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I pour the water in with the aromatics. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Draining the water is best. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I bought a brining bag from Bed Bath &amp; Beyond.  Says it will fit up to a 25 lb turkey.<br /> item not reviewed by moderator and published
A cooler<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
We've made this for years and use an insulated water cooler that has the spigot on the bottom that drains the water out.  The bird just sits in there head first like a swan dive :-) item not reviewed by moderator and published
^^best method! I have been using the water cooler for years on 25 lb birds item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes you can. The brine gets infused into the turkey and tenderize's it. The meat will be juicy. It's worth the extra step.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes, you can brine that one too! <div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I had the same concerns last year as you!  We used a 20+ pound store bought turkey last year that was in a salt solution.  We brined it for about 12 hours and it turned out great!  If you're very concerned, you can always cut the brining time further or decrease the salt.  We will be doing it again this year :) item not reviewed by moderator and published
Would never NOT brine a turkey again.  Be sure to rinse it after brining and before cooking.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Yes,that is an important step! But no betterment yay to cook a turkey. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Did you use kosher or sea salt? These are lower in sodium. Table salt is not appropriate for brines. Also, because of the brine, no additional salt is required for the bird or gravy from pan drippings.  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Almost all birds come injected with a 6% sodium solution...if you are using one of those, use 1/3 cup kosher or sea salt instead of 1/2. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Don't listen to them....most turkeys come injected with a 6% sodium solution as a preservative, which I've never had a problem with using his recipe for all these years.  Use 1/3 cup instead of 1/2 sea or kosher salt if it makes you feel better. item not reviewed by moderator and published
I've brined lots of butterballs. it's not my preferred turkey, but I always seem to end up with one...so yep! item not reviewed by moderator and published
lol...'they' do not dye the peppercorns red....  pink peppercorns came to be called such because they resemble peppercorns, and because they, too, have a peppery flavor.. but they are actually a dried berry from the Peruvian peppertree..  item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wow, good to know. We only use black anyway. item not reviewed by moderator and published
You may need to skip the brine. Check to see on the package if the Turkey contains salt. If it does and you brine, you will likely end up with an inedible bird. Otherwise you can still stuff the cavity with aromatics and follow the same cooking instructions. It will turn out great! item not reviewed by moderator and published
Are you 100% positive ? Can you also tell me why a butterball wouldn't work ?  item not reviewed by moderator and published
I recommend you brine. You will rinse all the salt off before you cook it. The turkey you purchased doesn't come pre-brined unless it states exactly that "pre-brined." I do it every year and it has worked with butterball perfectly fine. I hope this helps!  item not reviewed by moderator and published
This will work!  We did it last year! item not reviewed by moderator and published
I always use a butterball with this recipe....no worries. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Wouldnt hurt to add a little extra item not reviewed by moderator and published
No need item not reviewed by moderator and published
Low sodium stock, if you can. item not reviewed by moderator and published
Definitely use unsalted veggie stock!<div><br /></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>Ex chef...I would adjust amounts in brine, as you want the same concentration. Maybe adding 25% of each? Looking at this recipe, anything extra will only help. Adjusting the time...just check your thermometer and stop it at 161*, as it will carry up to 165 when you remove and cover. total cook time is hard to say as there are so many variables. Hope this helps!</span> item not reviewed by moderator and published
<span>Stuffing shouldn't have an effect on the brine side of things (obviously you'll lose the armoratics part of this recipe) - but are you leaving the stuffing in the entire time or removing to finish separately? <br /><br /></span><div><span>If you leave it in you will way overcook the white meat before the stuffing is up to a safe temp, the brine would at least help minimize the damage though... still, every recipe I've seen in the last 5 years says DO NOT try to finish stuffing in the bird, not worth either drying the white meat or risking unsafe stuffing. </span></div> item not reviewed by moderator and published
I do stuffing in the bird. just make sure the center if the stuffing is 165°.  item not reviewed by moderator and published

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