All the Best Cookbooks to Gift in 2021

Here are our picks for the most beautiful and inspiring cookbooks of the year.

Keep in mind: Price and stock could change after publish date, and we may make money from these links.
November 19, 2021
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A new cookbook can be a wonderful, personal gift, which is why we love to give and receive them, especially during the holidays. We've cooked our way through many new cookbooks this year, and have recipes bookmarked in many more to try in 2022. If you're looking for a cookbook to gift this holiday season, these are just some of the titles Food Network staffers can't get enough of. Not only to do they cover a wide range of topics like comfort food upgrades and healthful eating, they’re also so full of new and delicious dishes that the whole family will be excited about.

We encourage you to purchase from small businesses, including independent bookstores in your area or those that exist online. We love to shop at Bookshop for online shopping, and Indie Bound can help you find independently-owned bookstores near you.

$22.49

It’s a common belief that food can be either good-for-you, easy or convenient, but it can’t be all three. Tia Mowry’s The Quick Fix Kitchen readily disproves that myth. Full of family-friendly recipes that are simple, delicious and down-to-earth, Tia’s book is a must-have for anyone who wants to reduce stress in the kitchen. Between beautiful photographs, Tia offers playful and practical advice, like the best ways to get kids involved in the kitchen and her method for organizing the pantry (hint: it’s all about categorizing your cookware based on how often you use it). She also includes her definition of balanced eating, breaks down the labels on meats and produce, and provides a meal plan that accounts for busy schedules, different budgets and room for fun. No matter what you’re looking for — lightened-up pastas, 30-minute dinners or even a chocolate chip cookie for one — this book is sure to please. My personal favorite? Tia’s do-it-all base for three variations of quick bread: zucchini, pumpkin and banana. I baked a batch of banana bread for my family, who said it was the best they’ve ever had!

Leah Scalzadonna, Associate Editor, Programming

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$14.16

While some people see the repetitive actions of cooking as mundane, Nigella Lawson embraces the soothing, rhythmic nature of such predictability, in her twelfth cookbook, Cook, Eat, Repeat. Written during the four months of quarantine she spent in isolation, this book is a delightful combination of recipes intertwined with narrative essays that exhibit Nigella’s wisdom on food and life. Among her many musings, you’ll find an essay dedicated entirely to anchovies, accompanied by recipes in which the bacon of the sea takes center stage. Especially enticing are the luscious dip she calls Anchovy Elixir and her Celery Root and Anchovy Gratin. With dishes like Short Rib Stew for Two and Oxtail Bourguignon, plus a complementary essay, she passionately defends the seemingly dull brown dishes that don’t always get the love on Instagram. At the end of the book, she includes make-ahead, store and freeze notes for each recipe. Living on my own for the very first time, I resonated with this book immensely. It’s a must have for those who need a reminder that cooking can be enjoyable and therapeutic.

Anikah Shaokat, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$22.61

Brownies and cookies are great, but for some bakers nothing beats a fruity dessert. This year, apple pie and blueberry crumble fans will love receiving Martha Stewart's latest book Fruit Desserts. Though most fruity desserts come attached to a holiday (apple pie) or a season (berry cobblers), Martha's book is designed to allow fruit lovers to bake with produce all year long. Her Fruit 101 offers a list of fruits broken down by seasons to encourage in-season baking. Along with classic fruit pies, bakers will find recipes they may not have considered, like a Tropical Fruit Crepe Cake or Key Lime Creme Puffs. No matter what fruit your favorite baker is into, they're sure to find recipes to keep them baking all year long.

T.K. Brady, Senior Editor

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$19.48

Sometimes it feels necessary to hit the "reset" button. In her latest cookbook, Eat Better, Feel Better, Giada De Laurentiis offers her tried-and-true strategies and, of course, recipes for taking control of your diet, which includes a three-day regime she swears by. While a three-day elimination diet isn't for everyone, anyone who's looking to renew their pantry will benefit from Giada's Delectable Dozen and her own list of healthy and flavorful "superfoods." With these ingredients, you'll be able to make almost any of the 100 new recipes in this cookbook, including Hearty Chicken Bolognese with Zucchini Noodles, Penne with Spicy Calabrian Shrimp and Chicken Milanese. A combination of Italian classics and California-style plates, Eat Better, Feel Better is the perfect read for those resolving to "eat better" in the new year.

T.K. Brady, Senior Editor

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$21.96

When life gives you lemons, make lemon curd: that’s the motto Vallery Lomas chooses to live by. After winning season three of The Great American Baking Show, the former lawyer decided to leave her job and pursue her passion of becoming a full-time baker. Vallery’s determination has led her to become one of the most sought-after names in the world of baking. In this inspiring cookbook, you’ll find Vallery’s competition-winning recipes, like her citrus-flavored Tiger Doughnuts and zesty Blackberry Lemon King Cake. She also pays tribute to the three most important women in her life — her mother Diane and her two grandmothers, Willie Mae and Leona —with cherished family recipes like Leona’s Cornmeal Pancakes and Willie Mae’s pineapple-filled Million Dollar Cake. Brimming with fond memories, gorgeous full-page photography and expert tips and tricks, Life Is What You Bake It is all about managing the unexpected twists thrown at you — while baking or otherwise.

Michelle Baricevic, Online Editorial Coordinator

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$15.99

"These recipes are not the trendiest or the most Instagram-ready, but they are truly my favorites, the simple ones I turn to over and over," writes Katie Lee Biegel in her latest book, It’s Not Complicated. She focuses on dishes that require few ingredients and only simple steps, like Harissa Butternut Squash Soup, Skillet Broiled Shrimp and even her take on In-N-Out’s Animal Style Burger. In a nod to her childhood, Katie Lee also touches on comfort food classics such as Chicken Noodle Soup, Turkey Meatloaf (or "Loveloaf" as she so endearingly calls it) and her Grandma’s Whoopie Pies. There’s also an assortment of vegetarian recipes such as Mushroom and Pea Cauliflower "Risotto," Eggplant "Meat"Ball and Mushroom Bolognese. You’ll find recipes for fun cocktails — my favorite is the Amalfi Spritz. Whether you’re a seasoned cook or just beginning to explore the kitchen, this book will help you rethink cooking from scratch and make it easier to sit down for an enjoyable, home-cooked meal with loved ones.

Amanda Neal, Recipe Developer

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$20.99

Anyone who has watched The Pioneer Woman or read Ree Drummond's blog knows she can pull off from-scratch, multi-step meals with ease. But even for Ree, cooking for the entire family day after day can feel like a bit of a chore. Her latest cookbook, The Pioneer Woman Cooks — Super Easy, seeks to change that. Filled with over 120 full-page recipes, this book features some of her favorite cooking and ingredient shortcuts that’ll not only save fans time in the kitchen but also have them falling in love with cooking all over again. Standout dishes include Ree’s zesty Salmon Burgers, featuring canned salmon; a hearty Tamale Pie, which utilizes boxed cornbread mix; and a 10-minute Coconut Cream Pie — a dreamy combination of instant pudding mix, store-bought whipped topping and premade pie crust. Each recipe contains her signature step-by-step photography so fans can follow along as they cook. Photos and written updates about her family, including daughters Alex and Paige, her sons Bryce and Todd, her foster son Jamar, and her new son-in-law, Maurico provide an intimate glimpse into the life of the Drummond family. This charming cookbook makes the perfect gift for busy moms and dads, or anyone (myself included!) who has struggled with cooking burnout this past year.

Michelle Baricevic, Online Editorial Coordinator

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$17.98

For Jeff Mauro, there’s no better way to create memories than over a good meal with loved ones. In his latest book, Come on Over, the host of The Kitchen shows how to make the best food for a gathering, regardless of the size. Whether it’s game day, birthday or brunch, this book will help you create a menu for just about any occasion. Jeff’s Crispy Carnitas, Jalapeno Popper Grilled Cheese and Smoked Cauliflower "Butt" are sure to please a crowd. He also shares some beloved dishes from his Italian-American upbringing like his Aunt Phil’s Unstuffed Shells and Country-Style Radiatori with Vodka Sauce. And recipes for Homemade Real Giardiniera, Pot Roast Style Italian Beef and his tried and true Chicago-Style Deep Dish Pizza pay homage to his hometown Chicago. The recipes are accompanied by heartfelt and hilarious stories from his life, along with tips he's has gathered from years of hosting. This book is perfect for those who don’t need an excuse to throw a party.

Anikah Shaokat, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$26.06

It's always a treat when chefs invite you into their homes, sharing personal recipes and stories — and that’s exactly what you get in Scott Conant latest cookbook, Peace, Love, and Pasta. While it contains plenty of his signature pasta dishes like Pasta Pomodoro and Fusilli with Chicken Livers and Neonata, it also features new recipes like French Toast with Gianduja Whipped Cream and Stuffed Lobster that are every bit as brilliant. The featured side dishes alone — like the Brussels Sprouts with Calabrian Chile Relish, Pickled Eggplants and Zucchini Blossoms Two Ways — make this cookbook worth buying. He devotes a full chapter to Turkish home cooking, sharing recipes inspired by his wife Mel and her family: Think Beef Borek, Manti, Menemen and more. And the section on cooking for kids showcases Conant family hits such as Chicken Finger Salad and Raviolini with Melted Baby Tomato Sauce that are sure to convert even the plain-pasta-and-butter picky eater.

Trish Clasen, Digital Programming Manager

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$16.98

There’s no searching for obscure and expensive ingredients to make any of the family-friendly recipes in Just a Taste food site creator Kelly Senyei’s new cookbook. In fact, every secret ingredient can readily be found at a grocery store. It’s Kelly’s intention that all 125 recipes have a special something (aka a secret ingredient) that gives it an edge and keeps people guessing. Secret ingredients can improve the color or consistency of a recipe, add a unique flavor, provide health benefits or even a time-saving shortcut. For example, Kelly’s Vanilla Bean Drop Doughnuts get all the tang and tenderness they need from Greek yogurt (no yeast necessary), hummus adds a creamy boost to Healthy White Chicken Chili and fan-favorite Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookies are next level with a secret ingredient that may currently be in your fridge (you’ll have to buy the book to find out!). A busy mother of three, Kelly has recipes for every occasion from crowd-pleasing snacks to 30-minute entrees to holiday-worthy desserts. Each recipe was carefully researched, written and tested (and then retested). Find out why she adds ginger ale to her Pumpkin Waffles with Maple Whipped Cream (it’s brilliant) and just how good a smashed sweet potato makes her Three-Cheese Queso for a crowd.

Leah Brickley, Senior Editor, Culinary

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$22.86

With recipes culled from the 500 episodes of Beat Bobby Flay, this book gives Flay fans a unique glimpse into the makings of the hit Food Network show. From Coq Au Vin to Shrimp Pad Thai, Bobby provides over 100 "battle-tested" recipes that are as diverse as the show’s contestants. At the top of the recipes right next to the ingredients, you’ll see what episode they were featured on and the winner of that contest. He also shares bits of advice titled "Beat the Clock" and "In It to Win It" that teach fans how to be efficient and work smarter in the kitchen. I especially love his list of pantry favorites, which is a narrowed down version of the essentials he stocks the set kitchen with at the start of every season. It has everything from various chiles to whole spices and even Bobby’s must-have special equipment like a pressure cooker and spider strainer. Get this book for the home cook who wants to up their game in the kitchen.

Anikah Shaokat, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$18.27

Turning the pages of Trisha's newest cookbook feels like a warm hug. As she was working on it during the pandemic, Trisha writes about how these were the recipes that spilled out of her when she was reflecting on what's most important in her life. As a result, this book is chock-full of quintessential family favorites and heartfelt stories of cooking with her parents and kids. It’s got comforting family meals like the coziest Cinnamon Rolls and Giant Meatballs that almost invite you to rest your head on them. You’ll also find casual entertaining ideas, like Baked Gouda with Dried Cherries and Walnuts, and "Company Chicken" (which gets its oomph from Italian dressing mix) — perfect for serving to your nearest and dearest.

Lauren Piro, Editorial Director

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$22.49

Through comforting recipes, accompanying stories and beautiful images, Rachel Ray chronicles how the pandemic changed her life in her latest book, This Must Be the Place. Between the death of her beloved dog, the devastating fire that burned down her upstate New York home, and of course, a deadly global virus, 2020 was a difficult year for Rachel. But despite all odds, she persevered. In her new studio (her home kitchen) using only an iPhone, she filmed over 125 recipes for her hit cooking show, all of which are featured in her new book. It has everything from humble dishes made with pantry staples, like One-Pot Chickpea Pasta and Greek Sheet Pan Chicken, to recipes like Porcini and Greens Risotto or Moroccan Chicken Tagine perfect for a celebratory meal, even in isolation. The best part about this book, however, is that it reads like a heartfelt novel written in Rachel’s engaging voice and it motivates readers to redefine the meaning of home as the world adjusts to its post-pandemic reality.

Anikah Shaokat, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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Zoe Adjonyoh wants you to know how delicious the food of Ghana is and how easy it is to incorporate the cuisine’s ingredients and cooking methods into your everyday life. Open the book and it's not hard to see why. Onion, ginger and chiles abound, her ubiquitous "Chale" sauce has the trio simmering with fresh tomatoes and curry powder. Use it as is, on pretty much anything, or as an ingredient in her more complex stews and braises, like Kontomire Froe, a rich beef and spinach stew. She turns plantains and yams into terrific savory pancakes, and a fragrant curry with peanuts and basil. Her Jamestown Grilled Prawns are simple yet flavorful. They are marinated in lemon, garlic, ginger, hot pepper and shrimp powder for some extra oomph, then grilled over charcoal. Zoe slow cooks lamb with smoked fish, okra and "garden eggs'' (a type of white eggplant) for a dish called Ntroba Froe, which she lovingly refers to as "Ghanian Surf and Turf at its best." There are guides to the ingredients you may not be familiar with and a cheat sheet with recipes for sauces and spice rubs, like Jollof Dry Spice Mix and Suya Spice Rub that you can use in countless ways. Whether it's meat, fish, vegetables or dessert, it's all here wrapped in the luminous flavors of Zoe's Ghana.

Alexis Pisciotta, Culinary Purchasing and Events Manager

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$28.49

Jenny Rosenstrach's book The Weekday Vegetarians is perfect for anyone who, like me, is looking to live a more meat-free lifestyle. I can't tell you how many conversations I've had in the past year that ended with some version of, "I think I could be mostly vegetarian..." This would have horrified my 23-year-old self, who loved the butchering section of culinary school and ordered massive bacon cheeseburgers at every opportunity. But as my friends and I have gotten older, our tastes have changed. And we’re obviously not alone. Jenny’s veg-forward recipes will help you make balanced meals throughout the week and are all delicious enough to get everyone excited about dinner — think Artichoke Dip Pizza, Migas Tacos and Cauliflower Cutlets with Romesco Sauce. With a detailed mix-&-match meal chart, Jenny helps shift your mind from an animal protein-based starting point (I've got defrosted chicken breasts...I'll make chicken parm) to a vegetable or plant protein starting point (I've got a block of tofu...I'll make Crispy Smoky Tofu Sandwiches). Armed with the experience of switching her own family over to this weekday vegetarian lifestyle, she provides several "hooks" in each recipe — usually a wonderful warm carb — to draw the skeptics in. Her handy variations can easily modify a recipe to please whoever is at the table. Just add chopped salami or prosciutto to the Pizza Salad with White Beans for a carnivorous crowd, or veganize the Easiest White Bean Soup by skipping the parmesan and using a vegan pesto. There's so much inspiration in this book, I can't wait to cook through it all.

Julie Hines, Managing Editor, Food Network Kitchen App

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$16.59

Celebrated chef, restaurateur and "locavore," Peter Hoffman’s highly anticipated What’s Good? A Memoir in Fourteen Ingredients is a love letter to the farm to table movement trail-blazed by Hoffman in New York City in the 1990s. Organized by the seasons (commencing in Winter with Leeks and Potatoes), the book shares the trials, tribulations and triumphs of the journey that lead to the opening of his esteemed restaurant Savoy and beyond. With each turning page, we are immersed deeper into the good questions: What’s in season? Where does this ingredient come from? Who grew this? What’s good right now? Hoffman seamlessly addresses issues of race, class, colonialism — and even modern refrigeration and botanical history — through the lens of the culinary world. Sprinkled throughout the memoir are gorgeous, timeless recipes with personal stories, such as The Black Forty’s Romesco Sauce and his Pasta alla Norma. Hoffman’s connection to the earth and its bounty offers seemingly endless knowledge that connects farming to community. Whether you are a farm-to-fork enthusiast, seasoned cook or home gardener passionate about where your food comes from, Peter Hoffman’s well-written and highly entertaining memoir is a necessary addition to any food lover’s library.

Matthew Skrincosky, Food Stylist

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$20.49

A passionate tribute to author Mariana Velasquez's beloved country, Colombiana is filled with lush imagery and sensual storytelling. The range of recipes is vast, reflecting the great biodiversity of the country. You'll find staples, like Arepas de Choclo, and twists on classics such as Mogollas Chicharrons, buttery buns stuffed with chicharron to which she adds orange zest and ground coriander seeds to cut through the rich pork and brown sugar filling. Mariana shows us a variety of Sancochos, comforting stews of meat, fish, and vegetables meant to feed a crowd, served with aji, the ubiquitous and addictive punchy green sauce. She uses memory as a powerful ingredient to create dishes like Cucas con Helado de Malta, in which her childhood favorite spiced molasses cookies and beloved after school treat, malt soda, become an elegant ice cream sandwich. Mariana's love of entertaining comes alive in the carefully curated section of menus organized by region. From cocktails to dessert, they come complete with decorating tips and musical playlists, inspiring us to cook, gather and converse the Colombiana way.

Alexis Pisciotta, Purchasing and Events Manager

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$36.00

Native foods educator and chef Freddie Bitsoie says it perfectly: "Food is the most dynamic way to tell a story." In New Native Kitchen he does just that with 100 recipes of modern interpretations of indigenous cuisine. The executive chef of Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe at the Smithsonian and a Navajo of the Tabąąha Edgewater Clan, Freddie has spent his career holding fast to traditions while experimenting with contemporary methods. Together, he and James Beard-winning writer James O. Fraioli use history to tell the stories of native people and recipes, ingredients and tutorials that could be considered part of the next chapter of indigenous foodways. From Lamb Soup with Blue Corn dumplings to Chocolate Bison Chili, the chef shares thoughtful recipes that are accessible and easy to follow. A true educator, a recipe for Grilled Cactus Paddles is accompanied by a beautifully photographed how-to on cleaning the prickly plant. In his primer on beef vs. bison, he explains celebratory feasts like powwows and offers a list of continued reading for the curious. Freddie encourages readers to buy as many ingredients from indigenous vendors as possible and introduces us to modern native desserts like Prickly Pear and Cheese Mousse Tarts. New Native Kitchen "allow(s) people to appreciate the living artifact of food" and shines the light on much overlooked foodways.

Leah Brickley, Senior Editor, Culinary

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$17.99

In her latest cookbook, A Table: Recipes for Cooking and Eating the French Way, Paris-based American writer and New York Times contributor Rebekah Peppler offers 125 recipes, countless entertaining tips, as well as stories from her life in France that transport you to her cozy Parisian apartment. She starts with inviting snacks and cocktails, including an Amaro Old Fashioned and XL Gougeres with gruyere and blue cheese (inspired by one of her favorite neighborhood bakeries). With recipes like Eggplant Confit, French Onion Soup with Cognac, and Cassoulet, she teaches readers the basics of classic French techniques. She captures the array of diverse influences within contemporary French cooking with dishes like Bigger Banh Mi, Whole Artichokes with Butter and Za’atar and Lamb Tagine. And a French-inspired meal wouldn’t be complete without something sweet, so dive into her many desserts, including Fig Clafoutis, Creme Brulee and Alsatian Cheesecake, which blends her New York culinary school roots and French way of life. With a combination of repertoire-building recipes and tips on hosting a seamless dinner party and beautiful photos to boot, A Table is the perfect read for those looking to host and cook in the new year with a magical French charm.

Amanda Neal, Recipe Developer

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$17.99

Matthew Raiford invites you into his generational home with Bress 'n' Nyam, the story of a sixth generation farmer and his journey back to his Gullah Geechee roots. The dishes are paired with snapshots of Raiford’s family throughout the years and a family tree that reminds you of the long lineage where these recipes are rooted. Raiford pairs traditional family recipes like Muscadine Jelly made with grapes plucked from the vine his great-grandfather planted with dishes like Zaatar Chicken and Berber-Spiced Short Ribs that poetically highlight the African and Indian influences in Low Country cooking. Learn the nuance of a proper low country crab boil and how to shuck oysters to make his play on a classic, Oysters "Collarfella". Bress 'n' Nyam brings Gullah Geechee traditions to the forefront of elevated dining.

Nikki Scott, Culinary Producer

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$15.79

The Food Network Kitchen app team was lucky enough to work with Jake Cohen on a handful of cooking classes featuring recipes from his latest cookbook, Jew-ish and I knew it was going to be at the top of my gift-giving list this holiday season. Much like Jake, I grew up referring to myself as "Jew-ish" (for me, meaning I celebrate the High Holidays with lots of brisket and matzo ball soup, but I can't tell you the last time I stepped inside a synagogue). But a few years ago, a trip to Israel with my mom and sister helped me reconnect to my Jewishness. And the amazing food we ate made me curious about exploring all the varied flavors of Jewish cuisine. Jake's recipes, like his Perfect Challah, Roasted Tomato Brisket and Perfect Potato Latkes, hit on all the flavors I grew up with, and his Za'atar-Roasted Eggplant with Tahini and Sabich Bagel Sandwiches are reminiscent of dishes I enjoyed during my time in Israel. As an homage to his Persian mother-in-law, Jake spotlights recipes like Robina’s Polo with Tahdig and Persian Chicken and Celery Stew that I cannot wait to dig into. His recipes are not all traditional (Salt-and-Pepper Sufganiyot!) but they evoke so many familiar flavors and techniques, the book feels like a homecoming of sorts.

Check out some of Jake's classes on the Food Network Kitchen app:

Jake's Perfect Challah

Salt-and-Pepper Sufganiyot

Cacio e Pepe Rugelach

Chocolate-Tahini Babka

Julie Hines, Managing Editor, Food Network Kitchen App

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$16.99

After being at home for the last 19 months, we've all developed a fervor for making food from scratch. Dan Richer welcomes us to feed this new-found passion in The Joy of Pizza. The chef and owner of New Jersey’s famed pizza joint, Razza, Dan masterfully breaks down the nitty gritty of pizza making taking the time to explain everything from flour terminology, tasting tomatoes and the 101 on mozzarella. A section on cellular breakdown of fermentation with commercial yeast versus a starter doesn’t feel like a science class, rather a delicious journey of appreciation. The pictures and illustrations for each section will make you feel like Dan is right by your side as you make the dough, preheat the oven and stretch out your blank pizza canvas. Melted Anchovy, Corn Pie and Same Day Sourdough (yes, it's possible to make it in 24 hours!) are absolute musts. Whether you’re a season pizza expert or an intrigued beginner, Dan’s latest book is sure to bring you endless Joy of Pizza this holiday season.

Vivian Chan, Host and Senior Culinary Producer

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$35.99

Dive into a culinary journey of the African Diaspora, where contributing chefs share their stories of food and culture. The influence of people of color in the food world is vast and fully realized by Bryant Terry’s cookbook Black Food. Touching on the essential cuisine of many regions of African influence, every recipe comes with its own story of family, faith and perseverance. West African meets African American meets the Caribbean in a harmonious family reunion. Did someone say doubles and sweet potato pie?! Yes, please. Find Afro-Asian influences with dishes like Jerk Chicken Ramen and new fusions on classics like Black-Eyed Pea Beignets. Black Food contributor Monifa Dayo also boasts the recipe for The Best Potato Salad Ever... (yeah, she said it!). The rich history and traditions that come together to create the POC eating experience is beautifully told with short stories sprinkled between recipes. If you ever wondered what it means to put "love" in your food, this book has the answer.

Nikki Scott, Culinary Producer

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$23.48

Cooking at Home is an antidote to the typical industry cookbook. David Chang, of the Momofuku restaurant empire, and Priya Krishna, recipe developer and writer, aspire to transform the written recipe, from a static and highly specific set of instructions into a blueprint for cooking and eating multiple meals at home during the week. Mining their culinary heritages (David is Korean-American and Priya is Indian-American) and mostly eschewing Eurocentric-restaurant techniques, the pair focus on practical and efficient (though less heralded) methods to create more than one meal. One-pot stewing (even boiling!) large cuts of meat, like brisket and whole chickens, yields broth and meat to keep in your fridge or freezer that can be utilized in various ways. Say, a brisket salad, soup, stir-fry (like brisket fried rice), ice-slushy noodles (mul naeng myun) or even breakfast. Also included is a useful in-depth section on microwaving, covering everything from chicken thighs and frozen fish to rice and chawanmushi. The book is rich in information not typically found in cookbooks, like the value and use of frozen foods, ways to reduce dirty dishes and habits that can help avoid cross-contamination. By the end, you may feel lighter in the kitchen, recipes may become colloquial, and eventually, you may be able to cook without needing a book at all.

Vincent Camillo, Sous Chef

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$15.60

Grilling vegetables is a joy during peak produce season, and this book ensures that you have all the tools and advice to coax the best flavor out of all your favorites. Steven Raichlen's recipes are clever and flavor-forward — like Crispy Grilled Kale Chips with Poor Man's Parmesan (he mimics the cheese with anchovies and breadcrumbs; genius!), Grilled Artichokes with Harissa Mayo, and Baba Ghanoush with extra oomph from fire-roasted garlic. But each recipe's practical advice on the best grilling approach and gear is what makes this book a handy reference you will surely thumb through time and time again.

Lauren Piro, Editorial Director

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$21.99

Know a curious person interested in softening their impact on a stressed food system? Perhaps you’re already passionately engaged in activism and eating less meat is next on the list. Or you're just looking to add new plant-based recipes to your repertoire. Whatever the reason, Dr. Jane Goodall — whose 60 years of holistic and groundbreaking work with wild chimpanzees forever changed conservation-- has some great ideas on how to eat ethically without compromising deliciousness. The book, which is really a project from the Jane Goodall Institute, begins with an impassioned foreword by Dr. Goodall herself: "Choosing to eat differently does not have to be a radical change, small steps will make a difference." From there Jane and friends gently guide us with the help of delightful photography, ethical lessons (The Whys of Buying Local and Organic) and 80 very accessible vegan recipes such as: Black Bean-Butternut Chili with Masa Dumplings, Lemongrass Tofu Bahn Mi and Aquafaba Chocolate Mousse. Making meaningful mealtime choices to help reclaim our food system can guide us towards a hopeful future, or as Dr. Goodall puts it: "You can help set the standard for a food system that cares about people, animals, and the planet".

Leah Brickley, Senior Editor, Culinary

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$30.48

Italian American is not as straightforward as the title suggests. Yes, the book includes some of the fare that you’d expect from the stereotypical American Red Sauce joint — like Classic Meatballs, Chicken Parm and Grandma Rito's Marinated Roasted Peppers. A majority of the recipes, though, have a more modern point of view, using the backbones of classic Italian or Italian American recipes, and riffing on them with ingredients (or techniques) uncommon to the genre, but well-known to other regional cuisines. In their first book, the chefs of NYC’s Don Angie, Angie Rito and Scott Tacinelli, , apply their well-honed palates to craft such tantalizing dishes like Smoky Chicken Ragu with Mezcal, Chiles and Olives, Orecchiette with Chickpeas, Turmeric and Dandelion Greens and Campari and Orange Sticky Ribs. The book is filled with gorgeous food photography, charming personal headnotes and interesting historical tidbits which highlight each of the chefs’ Southern Italian heritage. With so many ideas and recipes — from handmade pasta shapes to many styles of ragus, baked pastas, desserts and meatballs (Sardine meatball!!) — this is a book for cooks looking for inspiration in a well-trodden area of cuisine.

Vince Camillo, Sous Chef, Food Network Kitchen

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$16.45

Lindsay Gardner interviewed 112 women to write the stories and recipes we see in Why We Cook: Women on Food, Identity, and Connection. Unlike most other books on this list, recipes are not the focus of Why We Cook, though many are included. Rather, this book is a love letter that gives voices to women across the food industry, ranging from chefs, farmers, journalists, activists, home cooks, and everything in between. Gardner keeps us engaged, profiling these women’s narratives through different sections like Memorable Meals, Profiles, Essays, and my favorite, Conversations. This book is the equivalent of looking through the notes in your mother and grandmother’s cookbooks and asking them the history behind what is written. These tales and recipes are, as Gardner writes, a reminder "that [we are] part of a vast web of wisdom larger than any one person, place, or time." Given where we are after these last two years, I can think of no better gift for the always-learning, sentimental food lover in your life.

Larisa Alvarez, Executive Culinary Producer

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$30.69

Abra Berens thoughtful Grist: A Practical Guide to Cooking Beans, Seeds, Grains and Legumes is here to disabuse holdouts of the notion that these little gems entail "leaden health food and endless cooking times." Berens dedicates the book to "...everyone who turns the soil," and her interviews with farmers remind us that understanding where our food comes from makes us better cooks. That understanding certainly shows in the smart, easy recipes that celebrate the titular ingredients. The book’s first section, Condiments, includes recipes curated to "give a jolt to the mellow flavor of grains and legumes," and while some may be familiar mornay sauce, romesco it’s helpful to find them in one place. The Ingredient-specific chapters that follow (each with many subsections focusing on a single type grain or legume) open with comprehensive, sweetly illustrated overviews and practical advice for soaking, storage and everything in-between. Then come basic cooking methods followed by recipes: Boiled chickpeas serve as the base of Whole Roasted Leeks, Chickpeas, Lemon Vinaigrette, Ricotta and Chard. No leeks? Try the chickpeas with Roasted Summer Squash Chunks and Romesco. She provides simple variations that entail pairing a pot of lentils or beans with some of her excellent sauces and condiments in "A Week Without Boredom" grids (because she knows there will be skeptics). If that strikes you as funny Berens is! Near the beginning of the book, she includes a section titled Farts. Who doesn’t laugh at the word, let alone the thing itself? For that alone, the book should be on your bookshelf.

Miriam Garron, Senior Director, Food Network Kitchen

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$24.77

If you or someone you know is looking for new ways to meal prep, let this book be your guide. You can use it as a top to bottom kitchen and menu planner, or just cherry pick what works for you — either way it's great! A recipe writing powerhouse, Dawn Perry knows how to draw in the home cook. Instead of just presenting recipes with ingredients you’re expected to have on hand, she gives you a full plan for stocking your kitchen, including making some ingredient staples you can use over and over again, like the 15-Minute Marinara that goes into her Cheater’s Tomato Soup. You learn to make special sauces, like Zing! Sauce, that can perk up that grilled cheese sandwich you make to go with the soup and practically everything else. Dawn also addresses the layers of a good meal that help boost your eating experience. For example, you can always have yogurt in your fridge and just keep putting granola on it --or you can follow Dawn’s suggestions and turn it into a delicious vehicle for nut butter, fresh citrus and toasted almonds or (my personal favorite) cucumber, chili oil and black pepper. Desserts are often the last thing I think of when planning a menu. But I’ve always got a few jars of jam in my fridge so making the book’s sparkly jam and nut tart was a cinch!

Michelle Warner, Food Stylist

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$23.38

America is a country built on many cultures and influences and so is its food. In his first book, Taste Makers, writer Mayukh Sen sheds light on the crucial role immigrant women of color have played in shaping our understanding of food in America. The James Beard Award winner often centers underrepresented women in his work, and his latest group biography profiles seven women — from multiple decades spanning from World War II to present day — who revolutionized the way Americans eat. Among these women are Chao Yang Buwei, whose cookbook, How to Cook and Eat in Chinese, was ahead of its time and has become the cornerstone of American Chinese food as we know it. If you like stir-fry and pot stickers, you can thank Buwei. The book also tells the story of Marcella Hazan, the Italian-born food writer who taught America that there’s more to Italian food than pasta and red sauce. I refer to her recipes often and getting to understand more about her history makes her food that much richer. All the women in this book have used food to tell the stories of places they came from and how their relationship to their native homes evolved in America. And, as Mayukh writes, "they did so with no shame. Only pride."

Vivian Chan, Host and Senior Culinary Producer

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$24.99

I have always been enamored by the innate skills of those who run the incredible mom-and-pop Pho and Bahn Mi joints, but I’ve never felt confident enough to attempt many Vietnamese dishes at home. That is, until Uyen Luu’s latest book, Vietnamese, came into life. In her debut cookbook, the food stylist and film maker eases you into the world of Vietnamese cooking, beginning with a thorough overview of The Vietnamese Pantry. She demonstrates how with only a handful of essential ingredients (fish sauce being the most important) you can easily learn to balance the characteristic sweet, sour, hot, salty, spicy, bitter and umami flavors of the cuisine. There’s a combination of simple everyday dishes, like Hainan Chicken and Rice and Sea Bass in Tomato Celery and Dill Broth, and larger, more ambitious recipes like Bahn Mi from scratch (starting with the bread all the way to assembly!) and of course, a classic Beef Pho. The book itself is vibrant with incredible images and design, exhibiting the rainbow of colors, tastes and textures of Vietnamese cuisine.

Anikah Shaokat, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$32.50

In her new cookbook, Thali, Mounika Gowardhan combines her endless knowledge of India’s varying regional cuisines — gathered through two decades of research and travel — with her effortless cooking style to bring a diverse yet approachable perspective to Indian food. Thali (which literally translates to "a large plate") is a complete meal served on a single platter a way Indians have been eating for centuries — and Mounika uses the thali as a conduit to help readers understand the true range of Indian cuisine. Each chapter of the book focuses on the necessary elements of a thali — chicken, lamb and seafood curries, dry vegetable dishes, stir-fries, dals and even desserts. Recipes vary from popular dishes like Home-Style Chicken Curry and Tadka Dal to lesser-known regional favorites like Spiced Bone Marrow Lamb Curry and Hot and Sour Prawn Pickle that are equally as delicious and surprisingly easy to make. You can use her handy Build Your Own Thali guide to create your thali experience at home, or you can also cook just one or two dishes because they’re all versatile enough to be enjoyed on their own. Whether you’re a novice or an expert in Indian food, Mounika Gowardhan’s Thali will teach you a great deal about the sheer breadth and delicious variety of this beloved cuisine.

Anikah Shaokat, Culinary Editorial Fellow

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$24.48

Written by viral TikTok sensation, Joanne Lee Molinaro, better known by the title of her flagship cookbook — The Korean Vegan is filled with heartfelt stories of how food can help us navigate life's struggles. Lawyer turned content creator, Joanne uses her platform to share stories of personal struggles hardships while assembling meals that look ridiculously delicious. The pages of her cookbook outline just how those meals (and many more) were shaped over the course of her life and provide clear instruction on how to make them come alive in your own home. Packed with striking photography and authentic family recipes, this cookbook is the perfect gift for a lover of vibrant flavors and stories that influence the dishes we eat.

Dana Beninati, Supervising Culinary Producer

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$29.99

As the author of 14 cookbooks, Dorie knows a thing or two about what readers want! In her own words, she describes this batch of over 150 recipes as those that "rely on basic techniques and have deep flavors and complex textures.". From deeply savory cheese scones to luscious creme puffs dripping in chocolate sauce, this cookbook encompasses anything and everything an avid baker could desire. The best part is - readers benefit from Dorie's decades of experience as she so generously outlines the foundational tips, tricks, and techniques that define successful baking.

Dana Beninati, Supervising Culinary Producer

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$18.99

Red Boat Fish Sauce is a family business, and their new cookbook is founder Cuong Pham’s love letter to his family. Throughout the book, Cuong shares heartfelt stories of life in Vietnam, beginning with his mother’s love for cooking and how her recipes accompanied him on his journey to America. These dishes that once kept his homesickness at bay form a good chunk of the ones you’ll see in this book, like Mom’s Ga Quay butterflied roast chicken with the most flavorful meat and the crispiest skin. With the help of coauthors Tien Nguyen and Diep Tran, Cuong provides recipes that showcase the holistic balance of salty and sweet, warm and fresh, and crispy and soft in Vietnamese food. In the first few pages, they share a crucial index of ingredients essential to the cuisine, with herbs being one of the key focus points. Every recipe looks so mouth wateringly delicious and they range from easy, like Sugar Cane Shrimp, to trickier dishes like Cha Gio Tom Thit crispy Imperial rolls with shrimp and pork. With recipes like Chicken Tinga and Pasta Marinara, Cuong, Diep and Tien cleverly demonstrate ways in which you can utilize Red Boat Fish Sauce for an extra punch of umami in non-Vietnamese dishes. I’ve loved Red Boat Fish Sauce since the first time I purchased a small 5-ounce bottle, using it very sparingly. Now, with this book, I’m really looking forward to further expanding my use of this product.

Michelle Warner, Food Stylist

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