All the Pantry-Raid Classes You Can Take Right Now on the Food Network Kitchen App

A great meal doesn't need a grocery store run!

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1200785686

Shelf of glass storage jars in kitchen pantry.

Photo by: Mod Quaint

Mod Quaint

By: Emily Boyette

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Whether you can't make it to the grocery store or you're just trying to save a little money, it's important to have a few back-pocket recipes that you can make with pantry staples already in your kitchen. Aside from the savings, utilizing food that's been collecting dust can really help get those creative juices flowing and kick-start your cooking routine. So take some errands off of your to-do list and make a budget-friendly meal out of what you already have, cooking along with some of our favorite chefs on the Food Network Kitchen app.

Flour

I treat flour just like I treat shoes – different kinds for different purposes. But I always keep all-purpose flour on-hand because it's so versatile and can handle almost any baking project I’m tackling.

Smoked Paprika Dutch Baby with Serrano and Fried Eggs, as seen on Food Network Kitchen Live.

Photo by: Scott Gries

Scott Gries

Not only are the ingredients for this Dutch baby simple (think: butter, eggs, milk and flour), but the toppings are completely interchangeable, too. You could replace the Serrano ham with sliced deli ham, turkey or even some cooked bacon.

How To Make Potato Gnocchi

With just four ingredients and no special equipment required, gnocchi is the perfect introduction to homemade pasta. It's also a great hands-on project that kids can help with. They'll love rolling the gnocchi with a fork to create ridges that help catch sauce.

Canned Tomatoes

I always have canned tomatoes on hand, and when I'm running low, I subconsciously wander over to that section of the grocery store – I can’t explain it. From pasta sauce to brunch staples like eggs in purgatory, I can always find a purpose for canned tomatoes.

Michael Symon features Tomato Baked Eggs, as seen on Food Network Kitchen Live.

Photo by: Brian David

Brian David

Michael Symon uses canned tomatoes as the base for this savory breakfast. His recipe calls for feta, shallots and flat-leaf parsley, but you can easily substitute with any cheese you have on-hand (whether it’s a hard cheese like Parmesan or a softer cheese like chevre), use an onion instead of shallot and you can skip the fresh herbs.

Linguine Puttanesca

Linguine Puttanesca

Pasta and a Spicy Melange in a White Dish

©Food: Jaime Kimm Prop: Marina Malchin

Food: Jaime Kimm Prop: Marina Malchin

Pasta sauce is a given if you're trying to find a way to use up canned tomatoes, but skip the traditional marinara and use briny pantry staples like olives and capers for a punch of flavor. Canned tuna is optional in this pasta recipe, but we like how it pairs with the other flavors and makes it a more filling meal.

Pasta

Pasta is such an easy meal-starter – it can be combined with just about anything to make a delicious meal. Nothing makes my inner child happier than a rich, buttery sauce, which can be easily upgraded to meals that are slightly more elegant.

It’s just Parmesan, pepper and pasta. (Say that three times fast!) Add some butter and don’t forget that liquid gold – I’m talking about the reserved pasta water. The starches in it take a pasta sauce from soupy to thick and creamy in just minutes.

Michael Symon features Bucatini alla Carbonara, as seen on Food Network Kitchen Live.

Photo by: Brian David Photography

Brian David Photography

The perfect dish for bacon and egg lovers, carbonara requires just a few ingredients you probably already have in the house, and a few others that can be easily swapped out. Michael makes his version with bucatini, but you can substitute with spaghetti or angel hair pasta. Guanciale, an Italian cured meat, can be substituted with pancetta or bacon, and although fresh parsley adds a bright, fresh flavor to the dish, you can skip it if you don't have any on hand.

Rice

Rice is as versatile as your imagination. Take cues from all over the world and make a wanderlust-worthy meal without leaving your kitchen.

Many cultures around the world turn fluffy rice into crispy cakes, from Persian tahdig to Spanish paella, which forms a crispy bottom called socarrat. This version features warm spices like turmeric, cumin and fennel, and in just minutes you’ll have the most satisfying brunch on the table.

Freshly grated garlic sauteed in butter amps up the flavor of this Peruvian-style side dish.

Beans

And lastly, the magical fruit. From stews, to refried, to dips – you’ll never get bored of beans.

From-scratch classic refried beans are easier to make than you might think, but it's all in the technique, so we love cooking along as Gabriela Camara teaches how to get that restaurant-worthy texture.

This Middle Eastern dip is the perfect snack – it's delicious, packed with protein, and made up of shelf-stable ingredients like chickpeas and tahini, a sesame paste similar to nut butter. The best part? How easy it is to make.

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