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Where to Eat in Little Rock

Cheese dip may lie in the heart of Arkansawyers, but there’s far more on the menu for those who venture into the heart of Arkansas. Here are the places the locals love in Little Rock.

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Photo: Kat Robinson

Lap Up the Best of Little Rock

Recently discovered by culinary travelers as a “secret foodie city,” Little Rock is home to variety of local and regional cuisines still being defined by food researchers and chefs. From barbecue and pizza to brew bites and sweet treats, there’s a lot going on in this Arkansas town — and everything’s within a 15-minute drive, no matter where you are in the city. Here are a few reasons why Little Rock has a lot more to share than beyond cheese dip.

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Photo: Kat Robinson

Lost Forty Brewing

Little Rock’s budding craft beer scene is headlined by this startup operating out of a warehouse near the Clinton Presidential Center. The name comes from a 40-acre plot in Arkansas’ Timberland region that somehow missed the blade of logging companies. Rather than settle for a simple tasting room, Lost Forty combines casual drinking and dining in its restaurant. Specialties such as housemade bratwurst, rustic meat plates with pickles and mustards, and even a platter of grilled split-grain sorghum bread served with sweet and savory butters are available to complement the seasonal beers that have quickly gained Lost Forty its renown.

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Photo: Kat Robinson

Heights Taco & Tamale Company

One of three Yellow Rocket Concept restaurants on this list, this Heights neighborhood joint commemorates the restaurant that came before it, the longrunning Browning’s, by elevating its Ark-Mex cuisine to delicious new levels. That influence is best seen in the Plato 1947, a re-envisioning of Browning’s Saltillo Platter, featuring a highly researched Arkansas Delta tamale, a cheese enchilada with house red sauce, a chicken taco and a guacamole tostada. Also, you have to give in to Melting Pot Cheese Dip, the deep orange cheese dip that “messed with Texas” by beating The Lone Star State’s queso in chip-to-chip combat.

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Photo: Kat Robinson

Doe’s Eat Place

George Eldridge bought the rights to open an eatery based on the Greenville, Mississippi, original, but he’s done it one or two better. Best-known as the place where Bill Clinton’s campaign staff whiled away hours during the 1992 presidential campaign, Doe’s delivers Delta tamales and incredible steaks sold by the pound. The unassuming diner’s main cavernous room is decked from end to end with photographs and memorabilia. The chili, always served with tamales, is an unheralded star.

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