Make Your Own Energy Drink!

Most bottles and cans of energy drinks are nothing but sugar water plus lots of supplemental vitamins and minerals. The beverages are also loaded with herbal stimulants and  caffeine. The safety of many of the herbal ingredients is questionable, and while caffeine may provide a temporary boost, it won’t give you energy (only calories can do that).

But here's a homemade energy drink anyone can feel good about sipping.

The recipe uses cherry and lemon juice to provide natural sources of vitamins and minerals, coconut water for electrolytes, plus a small amount of caffeine from antioxidant-rich green tea.

Cherry Lemonade Energy Drink

Makes 20 fluid ounces
1 cup brewed unsweetened green tea
½ cup 100% cherry juice
½ cup flavored coconut water
½ cup seltzer water
1 teaspoon agave nectar
Juice of 1 lemon
Ice cubes
Lemon slices for garnish

Combine green tea, cherry juice, coconut water, seltzer, agave and lemon juice in a large glass or container. Stir well or shake and serve over ice; garnish with lemon slices.

Nutrition Info Per Serving (20 fluid ounces)

Serves: 1; Calories: 119; Total Fat: 1 gram; Saturated Fat: 0 grams; Total Carbohydrate:  29 grams
; Sugars: 24 grams; Protein: 1 gram; Sodium:  30 milligrams; Cholesterol: 0  milligrams
; Fiber: 0 gram

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition. See Dana's full bio »

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