Food Network Stars at Home

Take a look inside your favorite Food Network stars' homes.

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2014

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Beatriz Da Costa

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Jason Varney

Photo By: Linny Morris ©Linny Morris

Photo By: Winnie Au

Photo By: Winnie Au

Photo By: Winnie Au

Photo By: Winnie Au

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Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Steve Giralt

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©© Dave Lauridsen

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©© Dave Lauridsen

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©© Dave Lauridsen

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©© Dave Lauridsen

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Photo By: ZACH DESART

Photo By: ZACH DESART

Photo By: ZACH DESART

Photo By: ZACH DESART

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Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards/Redux

Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards/Redux

Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards/Redux

Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards/Redux

Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards/Redux

Photo By: Peter Frank Edwards/Redux

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2015

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2015

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2015

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2015

Photo By: Dave Lauridsen ©dave lauridsen 2015

Marcela in California

Marcela Valladolid, the spirited star of Mexican Made Easy and cohost of The Kitchen, always knew that she wanted to raise her son, Fausto, 10, in an old house. And a year ago, she found it — a 1912 Cape Cod–style home that sits on top of a hill in Chula Vista, CA. "I wanted the place to identify with Mexico without hitting all the stereotypes," she says. So she dreamed up a signature style she calls Euro-Mexican. "No serapes or sombreros. I wanted something more clean, crisp and subtle."

Much of Marcela's furniture, like the wood-backed sofa and tufted ottoman, was custom-made by her interior designer, Kari Arendsen of Intimate Living Interiors. But the house is also filled with thrift-store finds, like a bar cart she scored at the Salvation Army.

The home has no air conditioning, so Marcela leaves the windows open in the hallway between the living and dining rooms.

A portrait of Fausto on the beach hangs in the living room — it was painted by his grandmother. 

Marcela's dining room used to be a patio, hence the worn brick floors. She had the table and chairs custom-built. "But I never host a sit-down meal," she says. "I serve buffet or family style and just scatter chairs all over." On the wall: Talavera pottery, made in Puebla, Mexico. The pendant lights are from Pottery Barn.

Ina in the City

We've all seen Ina Garten's East Hampton home on TV, but few fans have seen this private hideaway in Manhattan: The one-bedroom apartment is Ina's escape whenever she has a long day of business meetings in the city. "I wanted it to feel like a refuge — a place for her to curl up and recharge," says architect Daniel Romualdez. To accomplish that, he balanced the high ceilings with a warm, inviting sitting area. You might think the soaring space would call for bigger furniture, Ina says, "but it was the opposite."

 

The 1925 apartment came with original leaded windows.

Many designers fill big spaces with oversize furniture, but Romualdez kept the chairs low and close together to make the living room feel cozier. He also added warm colors: "A green couch, yellow chairs, orange curtains, a purple ottoman — I never would have guessed it would all work!" Ina says.

Romualdez rearranged Ina's living room into two distinct spaces: the sitting area and an office, separated by a stone fireplace. 

Ina found the dining table and chairs at Axel Vervoordt in Antwerp, Belgium.

The bookshelf, from Axel Vervoordt, is one of Ina's favorite pieces. 

The walls of her bedroom are covered in ivory fabric. "It feels like a cocoon," Romualdez says. The bed linens are Frette and Pratesi, and the bedside floor lamp is Crate & Barrel.

Jose in the Country

Iron Chef Jose Garces spends most of the week in a modern loft in Philadelphia, overseeing his empire of 18 restaurants. But come Friday, he and his wife, Beatriz, and kids Olivia, 11, and Andres, 7, escape to this 1850 farmhouse on 40 acres in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. "I wanted a real environmental contrast," he says. He hired designer Gretchen Kubiak to get the house move-in ready and gave her access to a veritable goldmine: a warehouse full of furniture that he has collected over the years to outfit his restaurants.

Jose's two dining-room tables were originally a larger piece that his designer cut in half. The leather chairs, from Restoration Hardware, were customized with Ralph Lauren tweed.

A puffy-armed leather club chair from Anthropologie is one of Jose's favorite spots. "I love to sit here and watch football while eating my mother's empanadas," he says. 

Another favorite: a 2,000-square-foot deck with a full outdoor kitchen.

Garces had the wood paneling in the upstairs hallway painted white to make the space feel more open.

In the dining room, a portrait of a condor (an Ecuadorian symbol of health and power) sits on a custom-built buffet table along with a West Elm lamp and vase. "Now the house feels pretty complete," he says. "I'm ready to just enjoy it."

Morimoto's Favorite Spot

Despite appearances, Hawaii is not a vacation destination for Masaharu Morimoto. The Iron Chef has opened two restaurants there in the past few years — Morimoto Waikiki in 2010 and Morimoto Maui in 2013 — and he has been traveling from New York City to Hawaii every two months to check on them. He got tired of staying in hotels, so last year he started looking for an apartment, and he bought the first one he saw — for the view. The apartment has two small balconies that overlook the lush Manoa Valley. "You could have an ocean view, but after 6 p.m. it's nothing," he says. "The mountain view gives you something to look at all the time…Being here makes me happier."

Kelsey Nixon in New York City

Kelsey and Robby collaborated by painting a navy blue statement wall (Robby's idea) and hanging bright graphic prints (her idea).

The open kitchen lets Kelsey keep an eye on Ollie whether he's playing with his toy vacuum in the living room, scrubbing in the dining room (the kid loves to clean) or sitting in one of the indestructible barstools at the counter, drawing rainbows and family portraits. His artwork livens up the mostly white room — and so do accessories like an apple-shaped cutting board that Kelsey rescued from the old set of Kelsey’s Essentials and her aqua spice mill.

The pink-accented Persian rug is one of Kelsey’s favorite things (it took some convincing to get Robby on board with pink). The midcentury dining table was their big splurge; it expands so they can seat everyone for their annual Friendsgiving dinner. The finishing touch is the fiddle-leaf fig tree: "Having plants turns a place into a home," she says.

When the couple found an apartment with a bedroom large enough for a king-size bed, they jumped. They scored a Dwell Studio bed frame on Craigslist and bought white-and-gold bedding to bring out the yellow in the rug. Kelsey’s most-treasured detail is the framed print of a father and son riding a bicycle that they keep on the dresser. "I gave that to Robby for Father’s Day," Kelsey says. "It's him and Ollie."

Kelsey chose pieces Ollie could use for years, like a blue trellis rug, wood-front dresser and modern white rocker. The room’s most-meaningful pieces are the "Be Brave" banner — the family mantra during Leo's life — and a picture of Central Park by Matte Stephens that hangs above Ollie’s crib. It was the first thing Kelsey bought for Ollie's nursery. "Wherever our family ends up, that print will be a reminder of when Ollie was born," she says.

Marc Murphy's Beach House

The Murphys' house has outdoor seating with ocean views on three levels, but Marc and Pam's favorite place to sit is right on the beach.

A lighted pathway leads to a small deck with Adirondack chairs, a perfect spot for relaxing with morning coffee.

The foyer connects the front of the house to the back deck and has ample storage for shoes (though, truth be told, everyone walks around barefoot in the summer).

To add some color to the room, they created a place to hang prints from their Instagram feeds (and maybe a few from Taylor Swift's).

Pam and Marc wanted to make this room a haven for rainy days, with a complete entertainment system. "TVs are an important part of my life," Pam says. She found the marquee-letter lights at Restoration Hardware Baby and Child and spelled out a family mantra.

The Murphys' living room sectional seats a crowd for cocktail hour, but it's also great for lounging with the kids while playing Scrabble on the large coffee table. Throughout the room, Pam added beachy accents, like a shell sculpture, driftwood and ceramic sand dollars.

Every summer the Murphys throw at least one huge party for about 180 people, and they put the rooftop lounge to good use. The sprawling space has a fireplace and a 12-foot dining table.

Marc has a full outdoor kitchen for cooking elaborate meals; he uses his Grillworks gas grill to cook meat, fish, veggies — and, once, a 65-pound whole pig. "It was so big, it practically broke the grill," he says.

The Murphys' outdoor living space has plenty of seating options.

Hanging lounges make it easy for the family to relax outdoors.

Marc and Pam chose Regatta Mesh Chaise Lounge Chairs because the fabric dries quickly — great for a family that's constantly in and out of the pool and ocean.

Jonathan Bennett's LA Hangout

Three graphic pillows add a pop of color to the gray sofas in the den.

Jonathan wanted the room to feel relaxed and lived-in, and an extra-deep leather sofa from Restoration Hardware was the perfect fit. He and his roommates chose the carpet based on a highly scientific testing process: "We brought home samples and then we'd lie down on them," he says, laughing. His favorite piece in the room is a coffee table made of wood salvaged from an old ship. "I wanted everything to be a little quirky," he says.

Jonathan had the large table custom-built to accommodate 20-plus guests at his annual Friendsgiving dinner. His friend, Willa Ford, pop singer-turned-interior designer, persuaded him to choose a vivid over-dyed rug to offset the dark wood. His unusual chandelier brings the whole room together: "At first glance it looks like crystal," he says. "But then you look close and see that it's hundreds of test tubes."

A commercial jet print above Jonathan's bed is a tribute to his late father, who was an amateur pilot. The midnight-blue walls (Poppy Seed by Behr) are dark, but natural sunlight streams into the room during the day and brightens it up.

Jonathan lounges around the fire pit in a Maya Swivel Chair that's covered in citrus-hued Sunbrella fabric. The material stands up well to the weather — and his house parties.

Katie Lee's Hamptons Hideaway

When Katie Lee bought her Hamptons house, she was afraid of how much work it needed — not because it was old and dilapidated but because it was brand-new. The 6,700-square-foot shingle-style house in Water Mill, NY, had no decor, and there was virtually no landscaping. “It needed some personality in a bad way,” she recalls. Katie loves antiques but didn’t know how to take this place from blank canvas to homey retreat — until her designer friend Nate Berkus offered his help. They filled her garage with furniture and accessories, “and then we just played,” she says. “It was like putting a puzzle together.” They added character to all those white walls with textured papers and paint in pretty shades of green, Katie’s favorite color. She loves how cozy and inviting the interior is, but the main draw is the backyard: “Entertaining in the Hamptons is all about being outside, so I like that the living room and bar area lead straight out to the porch,” she says. “My friends make a drink and then take it right to the pool. It all just flows.”

Katie loves the round marble table in the foyer because it’s the perfect catchall — and at 1,200 pounds, it’s way too heavy to move elsewhere. She chose pale green paint for the walls, inspired by the Laduree macaron shops in Paris, and a friend made her the (functional) wooden surfboard that Katie displays as art.

Katie grew up in a house where the dining room was never used, so “I wanted to make mine fun — somewhere people can hang out and not feel like the etiquette police are coming,” she says, laughing. She accented the room with kilim and sisal rugs, emerald printed pillows and art deco–inspired wallpaper.

Katie comes out to the house year-round from her apartment in New York City, and the den is her go-to spot for all seasons. “It’s cozy in the summer,” she says, “but it’s also great with a roaring fire.” She painted the walls a deep green, hung velvet curtains, then mixed in brass accents, like her 18th-century coffee table and much newer peacock mirror that Nate persuaded her to hang over the stone fireplace.

Katie knew she’d want to entertain outside, so she made the yard a top priority. She put in lots of wisteria and hydrangeas and set up a large dining area under the pergola. Her favorite addition: an outdoor pizza oven!

Maneet Chauhan's Nashville

Maneet Chauhan loves a pop of color. When you watch her as a judge on Chopped, she’s often wearing vibrant hues and gilded accents — and she dresses her Nashville-area home in the same fashion. Each room has its own palette and always includes something shiny. The living room is cream and copper, the dining room is blue and silver, and the foyer connecting those rooms is teal and gold. Although Maneet is a natural at decorating, the 4,800-square-foot house was a challenge for the former New Yorker. She and her husband, Vivek, joke that “our bedroom is pretty much the size of our first apartment.” After the family (daughter Shagun is 5 and son Karma is 2) moved here in 2015, Maneet took about a year to cover the walls of their new home in textured papers and fill the rooms with beautiful objects she and Vivek collected from around the world. “I wanted a place that’s contemporary but with hints of our Indian heritage,” she says. “India is a land of color, and by putting these accents around the house we were able to incorporate a little of where we are from into our style.”

Maneet and Vivek fell in love with the living room’s soaring ceiling, but decorating all that wall space wasn’t easy. She started from the top with a pair of giant mirrors from Ashley Homestore, then filled the built-in shelves with colorful vases and metallic sculptures. She paired a formal but comfortable pewter velvet chair with a cream roll-arm sofa from Restoration Hardware.

Maneet had a clear vision for the dining room: “Versailles meets modern,” she says, laughing. She started with a powder blue damask wallpaper, then found tufted side chairs with a similar pattern. She offset the traditional look of the large Brazilian wood table with a more contemporary overdyed rug and a bright teal hutch.

The glass cabinet in the dining room is packed with pieces of family history, including 400-year-old etched silver handed down from Vivek’s relatives and some more recent acquisitions, like Maneet’s James Beard Award.

Vivek purchased the giant gold Buddha while working in Indonesia, and the couple found the perfect place for it — at the foot of the stairs — after it had been in storage for 10 years. It serves as the focal point in a room filled with gold, including metallic art and a console table Vivek spray-painted himself.

The couple wanted the patio to be casual, colorful and playful for the kids. “Inside is more peaceful and Zen, but outside is fun,” Vivek says. The synthetic rattan furniture is incredibly low-maintenance. They entertain here frequently and use their collection of garden stools as extra side tables and seats.

Curtis Stone in Hollywood

To take on the cool, airy feel Curtis Stone and his wife, actress Lindsay Price, were after, the house required a little revamping (they painted the walls white and poured concrete floors). Next came the fun part: With the help of stylist Kate Martindale, Curtis and Lindsay (OK, mostly Lindsay, he admits) filled the rooms with a mix of new and old finds. They searched flea markets and antiques shops for pieces to show off inside their massive vintage glass-front cabinets. Lindsay's grandmother's dishes are on display, as well as silver trinkets that Curtis has a habit of picking up. "That's what I want our home to be," he says, "a collection of things that reminds us of our past, present and future."

Curtis and Lindsay love traveling, and their living room shows it. Inspired by a trip to Morocco, the couple bought Berber throw pillows and an octagonal metal side table. The cabinets hold Vista Alegre porcelain from their honeymoon in Portugal, and the subway signs are a nod to Lindsay's time in New York City.

Curtis' office is a bit of a man cave, by design: "I wanted it to feel more masculine than the rest of the house," he says. That meant navy walls, leather chairs and a wall of wine fridges (his favorite wine: Penfolds' Grange, a Shiraz from his native Australia). Curtis jokes that when Hudson stops in, "We do all sorts of wheelin' and dealin'. I'll make him a 'baby-cino,' which is just frothed milk with a dusting of chocolate on top."

"Why did the Realtor bring us here?" That was Curtis' initial reaction to the house. The walls were a muddy yellowish color that clashed with the dark brown ceilings, and the floors were coated in blue epoxy. But then he caught a glimpse of the backyard, with a pool, grilling area and room for a garden, plus a sweeping view of the Hollywood Hills — and he was sold.

The windows and doors leading to the backyard are almost never closed. "It's a good home for entertaining because we can just swing everything open," he says. The kitchen and living room both lead out back, so guests typically wander from the living room to the outdoor kitchen, the pool and — off in a corner of the yard — a dining area with a breathtaking view of the Hollywood Hills.

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