Canola Oil: Good or Bad?

Many of my recipes call for canola oil instead of butter to increase the healthy fats and cut out the cholesterol. I often hear “Wait a minute, isn't canola oil bad for you?” We’re setting the record straight. We’re setting the record straight.
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Many of my recipes (and these brownies) call for canola oil instead of butter to increase the healthy fats and cut out the cholesterol. I often hear “Wait a minute, isn't canola oil bad for you?” We’re setting the record straight.

What is Canola?

Today, canola oil is pressed from the seeds of the canola plant. Back in the early 70s, canola was derived from a plant called rapeseed. Rapeseed contains a hefty amount of erucic acid, which can be toxic in large amounts – this is where all those rumors came from! While canola and rapeseed plants are related (botanically speaking), they are very different. Canola oil contains virtually no erucic acid.

The Nutrition Facts

Canola is a good choice for cooking and baking because it’s low in artery-clogging saturated fat (lower than olive oil) and high in heart-healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats. Like other plant-based oils (like olive, safflower, soybean and flaxseed) it's high in vitamin E, cholesterol-free and has about 120 calories and 14 grams of fat per tablespoon.

See a comparison chart of the types of fats in plant oils.

When to Use Canola Oil

Canola has a neutral flavor and a high smoke point, so it’s handy for stir frying, roasting, grilling and pan-frying. It’s a good substitute for vegetable oil when baking – just swap out equal parts. You can also use it for marinades and salad dressings when you don’t want the flavor of olive oil.

Bottom Line: The rumors that canola oil is toxic are just that – rumors. There’s no reason not to add it to your healthy oil repertoire.

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition. See Dana's full bio »

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