Learn How to Eat an Artichoke

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Learn How to Eat an Artichoke

Materials:

  • Artichoke
  • Serrated knife
  • Melted butter
  • Spoon

Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Lay the artichoke on its side.
  2. Using a serrated knife, cut about a quarter off the top of the artichoke.
  3. Rip off the inner leaves surrounding the hairy choke center. These leaves have artichoke meat.
  4. Dip these leaves in warm melted butter, and, using your teeth, scrape the meat into your mouth.
  5. Peel away all of the excess leaves until you reach the center of the artichoke.
  6. Using a spoon, scrape out the hairy choke from the center of the artichoke.
  7. Cut what is left in half and do whatever you want with it!

How to Eat an Artichoke 02:00

Our Food Network Kitchen presents a lesson on how to eat an artichoke.

 

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