How to Make Edible Cookie Dough

No cookie jar (or cookies) required.

FNK_ChocolateChipCookieDough_H

FNK_ChocolateChipCookieDough_H

Food Network Kitchen’s Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough for KIDS/THANKSGIVING/CAMP CUTTHROAT, as seen on Food Network.

Photo by: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Renee Comet, 2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Sometimes the best part of baking a batch of cookie is licking the bowl (and beaters), or just eating the raw batter by the spoonful. That soft, sugary and pleasantly gritty treat is what nostalgic food dreams are made of. And we have a list of fun ways to eat dough beyond just licking the spoon. Alas, reality comes knocking. Eating raw eggs — and now raw flour, too — can bring the risk of foodborne illness. But there's still a way to enjoy cookie dough without the worry. Here's how to do it:

Egg swap

You still want a bit of wetness and the binding power of egg for your dough. Try using a couple tablespoons of yogurt instead. It will help give you the perfect consistency without all the worry of eating raw eggs.

Heat-treat your flour first

After some major FDA recalls, it is advised not to eat raw flour. Here's how you can make your flour safe for edible cookie dough:

Microwave the flour for your recipe in a small microwave-safe bowl for 1 minute. Remove and stir well. Microwave for an additional minute or until the temperature of the flour reaches 180 degrees F. Microwaving the flour to 180 degrees F may reduce the risk of foodborne illness associated with eating it raw or undercooked.

Also, use no-alcohol vanilla extract

Since the batter won’t be baked, find alcohol-free vanilla extract, especially if kiddos will be eating any.

Get ready to not bake

Gather all your equipment (and don’t turn on your oven). You'll need:

  • A small bowl
  • A medium bowl
  • A large bowl
  • A fine sieve, for sifting
  • An electric mixer (hand or stand up, whichever you prefer)
  • A rubber spatula
  • An airtight storage container

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough

Heat treat 1 cup of all-purpose flour. Sift into a medium bowl and then stir in 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and 1/4 teaspoon fine salt.

Beat 1/2 cup of packed light brown sugar, 1/4 cup granulated sugar, 4 tablespoons room temperature butter, 2 tablespoons plain yogurt and 1/2 teaspoon alcohol-free vanilla extract with an electric mixer on medium-high speed until well combined, about 2 minutes.

Add the flour mixture and beat on low until well incorporated. (Turn off the beaters and use your hands to help combine if needed.) Fold in a 1/3 cup semisweet mini chocolate chips with a rubber spatula or mix them in with your hands.

Makes about 1 cup of cookie batter. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Click here for the recipe and video.

Peanut Butter Cookie Dough

Heat treat 1 cup of all-purpose flour. Sift into a medium bowl and then stir in 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and 1/4 teaspoon fine salt.

Beat together 2/3 cup of chunky peanut butter, 1/3 cup granulated sugar, 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar, 4 tablespoons room temperature unsalted butter, 1 tablespoon plain yogurt and 1/2 teaspoon non-alcohol vanilla extract with an electric mixer on medium-high speed in a large bowl until well combined, about 2 minutes.

Add the flour mixture and mix on low speed until well incorporated. Turn off the beaters and use your hands to help combine if needed.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups of cookie batter. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Click here for the recipe.

Snickerdoodle Cookie Dough

Heat treat 1 cup of all-purpose flour. Sift into a medium bowl and then stir in 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon baking soda and 1/4 teaspoon fine salt.

Beat together 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar, 1/3 cup granulated sugar, 6 tablespoons room temperature unsalted butter and 2 tablespoons plain yogurt with an electric mixer on medium-high speed in a large bowl until well combined, about 2 minutes.

Add the flour mixture and mix on low speed until well incorporated. Turn off the beaters and use your hands to help combine if needed. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Makes about 1 cup of cookie batter. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Click here for the recipe.

Double-duty dough

You don’t have to just eat these by the spoonful. Here are some clever (and delicious) ways cookie dough and make something extra special:

  • Add to a milkshake.
  • Spread on buttered toast.
  • Use as a filling for a cookie sandwich.
  • Fold into ice cream.

You Might Also Like

Next Up

Giada: One Cookie Dough Three Ways

See how Giada uses one cookie dough to make three different cookies, an easy cookie plate secret.

Trisha's Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Balls — 12 Days of Cookies

Get Trisha's Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Balls recipe, and check out 12 Days of Cookies for dozens more recipes and holiday baking inspiration.

Ben & Jerry’s Is Now Selling Packets of Cookie Dough Chunks

They’re aiming to make 'Chunk Spelunkers' dreams come true.

How to Make Marshmallow Play Dough

Making your own edible play dough is child's play when you have marshmallows, plus a few pantry staples.

How to Make Custom Cookie Butter

You can blend your own cookie butter in five minutes flat.

How to Make Glow-in-the-Dark Edible Slime

Break out the black light to make this bright-green edible slime glow. Our icky, sticky recipe makes the perfect sensory play activity for kids — and adults.

How to Make Frosted Olympic-Ring Cookies

The Olympic rings symbolize peace, goodwill and global solidarity. Get into the spirit of the winter games in Sochi, Russia, by celebrating with these cute and colorful Olympic-ring cookies.

How to Bake Bread

Follow this 101 primer to bake your own loaves with ease.

Latest Stories