Which Cooking Oil Is Right for You?

It's no longer just a choice between olive oil and extra virgin olive oil. We've broken down common cooking oils (plus a few new comers) so you can pick the right one for dinner tonight.

1. Canola Oil

The high smoking point of this neutral-tasting oil makes it your best bet for dishes like fried chicken or french fries. It's also handy when making homemade mayonnaise.

2. Coconut Oil (Unrefined)

This trendy oil is praised as an all-natural vegan butter substitute. Use it for baking or quick sauteing, because of its low smoking point; use it as a spread for a hint of coconut flavor.

3. Corn Oil

This mild-flavored oil is inexpensive to produce and has a high smoking point for deep-frying but it's refined, which means it is stripped of most nutrients.

4. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

This sweet and light oil is best for making dressings and marinades or simply drizzling over finished dishes.

5. Olive Oil

Olive oil is a refined version of extra virgin olive oil meaning it has higher smoking point for frying but fewer nutrients.

6. Peanut Oil

Peanut oil is best for deep-frying. Its high smoking point means the oil can be strained and recycled up to three times.

7. Sesame Oil

This fragrant oil gives a toasty note to stir-fries, sauces and vinaigrettes.

More Shopping Tips:

Next Up

Which Meal Kit Is Right for You?

We surveyed the meal kits on the market to find the best ones for families, couples, vegetarians and more.

Which Wines and Oils Do I Use When Cooking? — Fix My Dish

Don't stress about what kind of wine to cook with. It's pretty straightforward: If it tastes good in the glass, it'll taste good in the dish.

Caption It: Right Here, Right Now

We're challenging you, Food Network Star fans, to write your best captions for this sneak-peek moment.

What Is Low-Carb Pasta — and Which One Is Right for You?

With so many to choose from, the alternative pasta aisle can be overwhelming. Here's a breakdown of four versatile low-carb pastas to try.

Grill Veggies Right

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens' Katherine Alford: You don't need a special basket to grill vegetables.

How Much Olive Oil Should You Use When Cooking?

You don't want to overdo it — but there are ways to eyeball the measurements.

Ahi Tuna Done Right

If the thought of preparing ahi tuna at home intimidates you, fear no more. Get some sushi-grade tuna and try this easy Seared Ahi Tuna With Ponzu Glaze recipe.

Choosing the Right Meats

Grilling is one of the lightest ways to cook, but to keep it that way, pick leaner meats. Make healthy meal choices with these tips from Food Network.

Choose the Right Syrup

Don't be fooled by the label "grade A" on a bottle of maple syrup: It's no better than grade B.

Take the Right Temperature

Hot Tips from Food Network Kitchens' Katherine Alford: To check a steak for doneness, insert a thermometer into the side, not the top. Aim the tip of the thermometer toward the center of the meat.

Related Pages