How to Peel Ginger

Fresh ginger is a pleasant aromatic that makes many dishes sing, but removing the peel can be a little messy. Here's how to do it.

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Fresh ginger adds a punch of spice and aroma to everything it touches. But before you use it, this funny-looking rhizome should be peeled. Here's how to peel ginger like a pro:

What to Buy

Buy whole ginger that is blemish-free, evenly shaped, and unwrinkled.

How To Peel Ginger, as seen on Food Network Kitchen.

Photo by: Felicia Perretti

Felicia Perretti

First off, buy whole ginger that is firm, smooth and blemish-free. An evenly shaped knob will be easier to peel. Wrinkled skin indicates that it is old and dehydrated.

Use a Spoon

How To Peel Ginger, as seen on Food Network Kitchen.

Photo by: Felicia Perretti

Felicia Perretti

To peel it, use the edge of a small spoon to gently scrape away the skin. Work your way around the bumps and knobs, slowly rotating the ginger as you go.

Prep for Cooking

Once your ginger is peeled, you can slice it, grated it, or julienne it for your recipes.

How To Peel Ginger, as seen on Food Network Kitchen.

Photo by: Felicia Perretti

Felicia Perretti

Once peeled, slice, julienne or finely grate the ginger to use in your recipes.

How to Store

How To Peel Ginger, as seen on Food Network Kitchen.

Photo by: Felicia Perretti

Felicia Perretti

Store unused ginger in a cool, dry place for about 1 week. Don't peel ginger until you're ready to use it. To keep it longer, wrap unpeeled ginger tightly with plastic wrap and store it in freezer. The frozen ginger can be grated without thawing.

Here's What to Make with your Ginger:

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