Thanksgiving Casserole Recipes

16 turkey day casseroles that save on money, time and dirty dishes.

October 29, 2021
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Cue the Casseroles

Yep, turkey and sides are classic, but may we present the Thanksgiving casserole? Casseroles that combine several Thanksgiving sides into one dish are a godsend. For starters, you can cook fewer side dishes but end up with enough food to feed a crowd. This cuts down on time, dishes and money. Most casseroles can be prepped or made in advance, then reheated day of, and they’re almost always made with readily available, budget-friendly ingredients. Casseroles are baked in the same dish that they're served in, which means they stay warm for a long time - you can reheat them in advance and cover them in foil, no last-minute scrambling necessary. Looking for some inspiration? Read on for our favorite recipes.

Turkey and Stuffing Casserole

Rachael Ray's take on a Thanksgiving casserole is, unsurprisingly, quite brilliant. It’s like a Thanksgiving turkey shepherd’s pie: with the stuffing on top in place of the potatoes. And, most importantly, it leans on ground turkey for classic Thanksgiving flavor instead of cooked turkey meat, which will save you a pretty penny. If you're hosting a smaller Thanksgiving gathering, we'd argue you could cook this dish instead of a whole turkey and stuffing.

Get the Recipe: Turkey and Stuffing Casserole

Sweet Potato Casserole

Popping the sweet potatoes in the oven to roast makes prepping them easier because you don’t have to peel them. Plus, roasted sweet potatoes concentrates their flavor, making a richer, sweeter and more intensely sweet potato-ey casserole. You can make it ahead and refrigerate it for 2 days, just be sure to let it come to room temperature before putting it in the oven.

Get the Recipe: Sweet Potato Casserole

Brussels Sprouts Casserole

Making Brussels sprouts in casserole form - topped with fried onions - is a nice nod to both Brussels sprouts and green bean casserole. This casserole fits in any Thanksgiving dinner timetable because you start it on the stove and then it goes in the oven at 400 degrees F for 20 minutes: the same time and temperature you'd probably use to bake fresh rolls while the turkey rests.

Get the Recipe: Brussels Sprouts Casserole

Make-Ahead Green Bean Casserole

Since we know that every year we’re going to be making a green bean casserole anyway, it might as well be made ahead. In fact, this recipe can be made 2 weeks ahead of Thanksgiving and frozen. The secret flavor ingredient? A homemade mushroom soup base, instead of mushroom soup from a can, which imparts layers of creaminess.

Get the Recipe: Make-Ahead Green Bean Casserole

Dump-and-Bake Corn Casserole

Dump-and-Bake Corn Casserole is a dish that far outshines its name. It’s creamy and scrumptious, and except for the ham and scallions, you don’t even need to really measure anything: most of the steps involve simply opening and dumping in an entire box, can or pouch. And we have to admit it—we love this dish because of the canned corn. There’s just something about its sweet, familiar flavor that takes us back to childhood in the very best way.

Get the Recipe: Dump-and-Bake Corn Casserole

Breakfast Casserole

There’s a good chance you have guests showing up on Wednesday, and they’re going to need breakfast on Thanksgiving morning. We think letting them help by making this breakfast casserole that needs to sit in the fridge overnight is a great way to get people involved. If you want them out of your way, cook the sausage and scallions before they arrive, and have them do the rest. You might want to follow that plan for every holiday—that’s how traditions get started.

Get the Recipe: Breakfast Casserole

Cheesy Mushroom and Broccoli Casserole

There are some recipes that you bring out for Thanksgiving and then you don’t see them again for a year. Cheesy Mushroom and Broccoli Casserole is not one of those recipes. Everything you want in a side is in this casserole: plenty of vegetables with the mushrooms and the broccoli, and rice for starch. We think it’s holiday-worthy and everyday-simple.

Get the Recipe: Cheesy Mushroom and Broccoli Casserole

Vegan Green Bean Casserole

When you’re making a Thanksgiving feast for a large group, chances are there will be one or two vegans or vegetarians. You could adapt a recipe you have, but that takes time, and the Thanksgiving feast for a large group isn’t going to cook itself. We’ve got you covered with this vegan version of an old standby. For creaminess, it leans on almond milk and dairy-free sour cream; for umami, it's got meaty cremini mushrooms and soy sauce.

Get the Recipe: Vegan Green Bean Casserole

Southern Baked Mac and Cheese

This rich and decadent baked pasta is a Southern staple for Thanksgiving and every other holiday. Cook the noodles on the stove, drain and then stir everything together in the biggest bowl you have before transferring it to your casserole. We know this is a splurge, but hey ... it’s Thanksgiving.

Get the Recipe: Southern Baked Mac and Cheese

Scalloped Potato Gratin

Simmering the herbs in cream before you pour the mixture over the potatoes is the key to the flavor in these scalloped potatoes. You can make this ahead and reheat it for your holiday dinner; it's best to let it rest for 15 minutes after reheating before cutting it so it's easier to slice and serve.

Get the Recipe: Scalloped Potato Gratin

Loaded Baked Potato Casserole

Loaded is not an exaggeration. Two cheeses, sour cream, bacon and scallions are the toppings for these crispy chopped potatoes. If your family isn't attached to mashed potatoes, this dish is a fun alternative; it also makes a fantastic substantial appetizer to pair with the football game.

Get the Recipe: Loaded Baked Potato Casserole

Scalloped Corn

This dish has the corn, the cheese (white cheddar), the creamy sauce and the crunchy topping (buttery cracker crumbs) that define the perfect scalloped corn recipe. It will mix right into any Thanksgiving menu.

Get the Recipe: Scalloped Corn

Stuffed Mushroom Casserole

We love this casserole because it gives you all that classic stuffed mushroom flavor and texture but doesn't require you to actually stuff any mushrooms (hello, gift of saved time). Plus, you can prep everything in advance and pop the dish in the oven 35 minutes before dinner.

Get the Recipe: Stuffed Mushroom Casserole

Fried Green Bean Casserole

Fried Green Bean Casserole is a dish that can be enjoyed before dinner as an appetizer, or sit on a buffet with five other side dishes. It has all the elements of a traditional green bean casserole, but you can (if you want) eat it with your fingers, using the creamy gravy as a dipping sauce.

Get the Recipe: Fried Green Bean Casserole

Mushroom and Leek Bread Pudding

Savory bread puddings are one of our favorite sides for a large gathering like Thanksgiving because they can be prepped ahead of time and kept in the fridge overnight, just like a breakfast casserole. With mushrooms, pancetta and cheese, this recipe is loaded with umami - we predict it will become a family favorite.

Get the Recipe: Mushroom and Leek Bread Pudding

Small-Batch Green Bean Casserole

Not every Thanksgiving dinner is a gathering of 23 people. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have turkey and all the trimmings. You can, and you won’t have leftovers for weeks with this scaled-down version of green bean casserole, that has everything a big batch has.

Get the Recipe: Small-Batch Green Bean Casserole

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