A Fresh Guide to Citrus Fruits

The juicy details on some of the season's tastiest varieties.

The hosts share fresh new citrus fruits on the market, as seen on Food Network's The Kitchen

Looking for a few new citrus varieties? Here's everything you need to know to shop, store and enjoy these appealing fruits.

Pomelos

Pomelos, also known as pamplemousse, are the largest citrus fruits. The pomelo is considered the 'father' of the grapefruit, since grapefruit is a cross between the orange and pomelo. Pomelos have a much thicker pith than other citrus varieties. The flesh is sweeter and less bitter than that of a grapefruit. When shopping for pomelos, look for pale green to yellow fruit that feels heavy for its size. Avoid pomelos with soft spots, ones with dull color or ones that look dried out. You can store them in the refrigerator for about a week. Enjoy pomelos as you would a grapefruit: raw as a snack, juiced, in a salad or salsa or to make jam.

Tangelos

Tangelos are a cross between a tangerine and a pomelo. They can be easily recognized by their "nipple" at the stem. Tangelo's peels are loose and easy to remove, but avoid fruits with soft spots. Look for citrus that feels heavy for its size and has an even skin color. You can store tangelos in the crisper section of your refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Tangelos have a tart and tangy taste and are a great substitute in recipes that call for a tangerine or an orange, especially in marinades, sauces and desserts.

Satsuma Mandarins

Satsuma mandarins are a hybrid of a mandarin orange and a pomelo. They are seedless, easy to peel and known as one of the sweetest citrus varieties. Satsuma mandarins are typically sold with their leaves still attached, not just for a visually appealing display, but because the branches help protect the fruit while it's transported. When shopping for this citrus, give it a squeeze to feel for any soft spots, since the delicate skin can be easily damaged. You can store them in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 weeks. Try Satsuma mandarins in salads, on yogurt or in Satsuma Curd.

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