Our Guide to the Best Citrus Juicers

We put the squeeze on all manner of citrus to find the top juicers on the market!

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June 05, 2019
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Photo By: Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty

Which Citrus Juicer Is Right for You?

There’s nothing more refreshing than cold lemonade on a hot day, or a glass of fresh OJ to jumpstart your morning. But why grab a carton, when juicers make squeezing a breeze? We’re talking everything from compact presses to manual reamers to electric versions that can break down bags of citrus in seconds. Here’s a peek at some of our favorite juicers out there, whether you’re hoping to streamline your cooking routine or looking to launch your own lemonade stand!

Best Overall: KitchenAid Citrus Squeezer

It’s rare to find genuinely useful upgrades on tried-and-true kitchen products. But so many elements of this ingenious squeezer led us to think: Why didn’t anyone think of this sooner? Instead of subjecting yourself to carpal tunnel syndrome, trying to manually juice citrus over a glass, get this KitchenAid squeezer. It's designed to sit on a countertop, meaning you only need to press down for excellent leverage. A built-in strainer efficiently traps unwanted pulp and stray seeds, and juice stays contained within the press itself before being poured into a drinking vessel from an integrated spout.

Buy It: Amazon, $19.49

Best Manual: Joie Squeeze and Pour Citrus Juicer and Glass

If you want to raise your orange juice game, the name of this compact, easy-to-store juicer says it all. You simply squeeze your fruit against the reamer, which is highly effective at catching pulp and pits, and watch the juice stream into a glass canister, which prevents it from gathering any off-flavors. A built-in spout allows you to pour the pure, fresh liquid directly into a cup. It’s hardly more difficult than opening up a from-concentrate box!

Buy It: Amazon, $10.95

Best for Cooking Purposes: Chef’n LemonDrop

So many recipes call for 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, or 1/2 teaspoon of lime. But frankly, what reads as a simple instruction is actually an awkward chore: Are you supposed to squeeze your citrus over a spoon in order to get that measurement? Well, Chef’n’s clever LemonDrop streamlines that process. Just twist the ridged tool into your lemon, flip it over, and pour whatever collects in the silicone cap into a tiny cup, marked from 1 teaspoon to 2 tablespoons. You can also use it to store cut citrus, or, since it’s palm-sized, just stash it in your kitchen junk drawer.

Buy It: Amazon, $7.99

Best Electric: Black + Decker Citrus Juicer

Only the slightest bit of downward pressure is needed to make short work of enough fruit to hydrate a football team! The Black + Decker comes with both small and large cones to accommodate any size of citrus, has adjustable pulp control, and channels juice directly into a 32-ounce canister, complete with measuring cup marks and a cover for storage. All elements of this Amazon best-seller are dishwasher safe (except for the base) and can be taken apart easily for deep cleaning, or if you just want to do a bit of a rinse when switching between citrus.

Buy It: Amazon, $20.37

Best for Kids: Proctor Silex Alex’s Lemonade Stand Citrus Juicer

Created in memory of a young girl named Alex, who started a lemonade stand to raise money to find a cure for childhood cancer, $1 of every purchase now goes to her foundation. And that’s only one reason to make this your go-to juicer. Sunshine yellow, and accompanied by an extensive recipe booklet with tips on starting your own lemonade stand, it’s a perfect purchase for kids. And adults will find it totally useful, too, thanks to a pulp control dial, dual reamers with nested storage for small and large fruit, and a detachable pitcher with measurement marks that you can serve directly from.

Buy It: Amazon, $22.99

How We Tested

We ordered a selection of squeezers, manual juicers and electric juicers, to determine which types — and models — performed the best. We looked at the instruction booklets first, to see how clear they were to follow, how much assembly was required, how to care for the juicers, and if they had any extra features or made any special claims (such as, “Produces 20% more juice than conventional juicers!”). Then we passed lemons, limes and, if they would fit, oranges through each juicer, taking note of how much pressure we needed to exert, how much juiceable flesh they were able to extract, and if they were able to effectively weed out pulp, pith and pits. We also assessed how easy they were to take apart and clean, especially if we wanted to switch between fruits during use, and which parts, if any, could be put in the dishwasher.