A Guide to Buying and Cooking Trout

A Guide to Cooking Trout

FoodNetwork-Fish7/13/06

Photo by: Theresa Raffetto ©Theresa Raffetto

Theresa Raffetto, Theresa Raffetto

There are many species of trout, and they are all smaller freshwater members of the salmon family. Diet and habitat determine the color of its delicate flesh, which ranges from ivory to pinkish.

Wild-caught trout tastes best while the quality of farm-raised trout varies. It can have good flavor and firm texture, but some farm-raised trout can be mushy and have a muddy taste. Steelhead trout and Arctic char are saltwater relatives of trout that are also farm-raised.

At the market, look for a layer of transparent slime covering whole trout; the more slippery the fish, the fresher it is. Sold whole or filleted, it is best sautéed, roasted, broiled or grilled. Try giving it a light dusting of flour and a quick sauté, and top with brown butter, lemon and capers.

Salmon can be substituted in most recipes.

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