jerk seasoning


A dry seasoning blend that originated in Jamaica and is used primarily in the preparation of grilled meat. The ingredients can vary, depending on the cook, but Jamaican jerk blend is generally a combination of chiles, thyme, spices (such as cinnamon, ginger, allspice and cloves), garlic and onions. Jerk seasoning can be either rubbed directly onto meat or blended with a liquid to create a marinade. In the Caribbean, the most common meats seasoned in this fashion are pork and chicken. Such preparations are referred to as jerk pork and jerk chicken.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

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