blush wines


In the United States, the phrase "blush wine" has almost replaced that of rosé, which is considered somewhat passé. Initially, the term applied to very pale-colored rosé wines. Today, however, it's used to encompass a full spectrum of wines that, like rosés, are generally made with red grapes. The juice has had only brief (2 to 3 days') contact with the stems and skins—the reason for the wines' pale color. The term "blush," however, is broadly used to describe wines that can range in color from various shades of pink to pale orange to light red. Unlike the common rosé, blush wines can range from dry to sweet and may be light- to medium-bodied. They should be served chilled—but not icy—and may accompany a variety of lightly flavored foods.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

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