eggnog


A homogeneous blend of milk or cream, beaten eggs, sugar, nutmeg and usually liquor of some kind such as rum, brandy or whiskey. Liquor-free eggnog has long been served to convalescents and growing children as a tonic. Some eggnogs are made by separating the eggs and stiffly beating the whites before adding them to the milk mixture, producing an airier brew. Commercial eggnog is sans liquor and is available in cartons beginning around mid-October. Canned eggnog can be found year-round in some locations.

From The Food Lover's Companion, Fourth edition by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst. Copyright © 2007, 2001, 1995, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

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